The Audition by Kenneth Robbins

Drama/ 1 character, 1 Woman/ One Act

Synopsis:
Amy arrives at a small out-of-the-way theatre in New York, expecting to audition for a new play. But no one is there. She is locked into the theatre accidentally. Since she is alone on a stage with no way to get out, she decides to share her audition pieces with the ghost of the theatre. She offers selections from numerous plays including Hamlet, Hedda Gabler, and others. The fact that she suffers from paranoia becomes apparent as she discovers a bag of props left at the back of the theatre and in it, she finds a pistol, loaded. How she uses this prop is the payoff of the play.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:Amateur and professional rights:
Lettie Lee
Ann Elmo Agency, Inc.
60 E. 42nd Street, Suite 437
New York, NY 10165
Telephone: (212) 661-2880; fax: (212) 661-2883.

About the Playwright: Kenneth Robbins is the author of four published novels and 21 published plays, as well as four collections of literary works. His work has received the Toni Morrison Prize for Fiction, the Associated Writing Programs Novel Award, the Charles Getchell Award, and a Corporation for Public Broadcasting Award, among others.

His works for the stage have been produced by the New Works Theatre, Dallas Theater Center, Nashville Academy Theatre, Theatre Atlanta Off Peachtree, and the Project Arts Center, Dublin, Ireland. His radio play, Dynamite Hill, was aired over National Public Radio and BBC Radio 3.

The Audition was first presented by Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, and received its professional premiere at Teaterpaedogy, Copenhagen in 2001.

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The Best Woman by Gary Earl Ross

Comedy-Drama / 9 Characters, 5 Men, 4 Women / Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis:
For the first time, both major party presidential candidates are women. Dr. Nea Gilchrist, former Secretary of State and the first African-American woman Vice President, must distance herself from Sam Houston Bullard, the conservative Republican President to whom she owes her political success. Senator Amanda Dean Styles, a white northeastern liberal and the widow of Brendan Styles, a charismatic Democratic presidential candidate, must emerge from the shadows of the tragedy that shaped her political future. Tonight is their first debate . . .

From The Buffalo News: “The strength of the play comes not in the scenes between the two candidates, but as their political advisers strategize and plot backstabbing techniques before the debate . . . . Surprisingly, Ross reserves equal vitriol for both sides of the aisle in this play, while he could very well have let it slip into a raving diatribe against the Bush administration. In a particularly telling scene, Gilchrist, the Republican candidate, gets a call from Rev. Bob Patterson, Ross’s version of televangelist Pat Robertson. Speaking about the gay group the Log Cabin Republicans, Patterson suggests, ‘If they want to be gay, they should just be Democrats.’

“When the phone call is over, Gilchrist quips, ‘People like him used to be presidential assassins, not presidential advisers.’ It’s an unexpected humanization of the Republican side of things, and a look into the hypocrisy inherent in running a campaign for either party. It’s refreshing to see Gilchrist not as a possessed neoconservative pawn, but a woman, as Ross puts it, whose ‘good intentions deprived her of a deeper social conscience.’ But, conversely, the good intentions of The Best Woman can only make our social consciences deeper.”

“Well-written and tightly constructed, its characters imbued either with authentic good nature or downright fiendishness . . . . [the] smart, cutting dialogue is engaging enough to make the drama at least as amusing as the political process of the last few years.
– Colin Dabhowski, Buffalo News

“Gary Earl Ross, who achieved a huge success with his play, Matter of Intent, which won the Emanuel Fried Award at the Arties before going on to win the 2005 Edgar Award for best play from the Mystery Writers of America, has turned his attention to politics in his new play, The Best Woman . . . . Ross’s writing is witty and provides a rapid pace for the actors . . . . The playwright lavishes time on a second act television debate making it clear that his main goal is parody, not drama.”
– Anthony Chase, Artvoice Theater Week

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Contact information:Amateur and professional rights:
Gary Earl Ross
228 Highgate Avenue
Buffalo, NY
USA, 14215
Ph: (716)308-0807
Email: geross@buffalo.edu

About the Playwright: Gary Earl Ross is a language arts professor at the University at Buffalo EOC and the author of more than 170 published short stories, poems, articles, scholarly papers, and public radio essays. Named Erie County’s 2003 Artist of the Year, Ross has won numerous awards for writing, including a LIFT Fiction Fellowship, an Artie Award for the play Matter of Intent, and for his public radio essays first place commentary awards from the New York State Associated Press and the New York Broadcasters’ Association.

Readers of Artvoice voted him the 2008 Best Writer in Buffalo. His books and staged plays include The Wheel of Desire and Other Intimate Hauntings (2000), Shimmerville: Tales Macabre and Curious (2002), Sleepwalker: The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (2002), the children’s tale Dots (2002), Matter of Intent (2005 Ujima Theater world premiere and winner of the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America), Picture Perfect (from the 2007 Tennessee Stage Company New Play Festival in Knoxville), and The Best Woman (from Ujima in 2007).

A member of the Dramatists Guild of America, the Mystery Writers of America, and the Just Buffalo Literary Center, Ross was recently named playwright-in-residence at Ujima Company and was awarded a 2008 Constance Saltonstall Foundation Playwriting Grant. His novel,Blackbird Rising, was published in 2009, and Matter of Intent received a staged reading at London’s Bridewell Theater in June 2009.

Best Woman was first produced by the Ujima TheatreLoft, Buffalo, New York in 2007.

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The Cellar by George Freek

Comedy-Drama/ 5 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Three Acts

Synopsis:
(from The Denver Post): “The Cellar is the story of the kind of family unit that Tom Wolfe used to call ‘Mom-Dad-Buddy-Sis’ in his satirical excursions across middle-class America. Playwright George Freek has created his own nuclear family unit called Mom, Dad, Sunny, and Honey — plus a blind man who lives in their basement.

“Like Pinter, Freek can turn a kitchen paring knife or an ordinary screwdriver into a cottage monster . . . . The most insipid small talk about the weather or fast-food coupons or soap operas begins to build into a house of cards, all smeary-fingered and stained with misuse. For a time, the parents’ dialogue is parody, but it tilts sickeningly with the arrival of Sunny, the amoral cheat and son of the house. We realize that we are in the whitewashed interior of a cherfully clean bungalow where invisible fungus creeps. Father is a closet pederast, mother is desensitized, and daughter Honey is a prostitute.”Freek reveals all this by means of lurching and elliptical speeches . . . . For years, this family has sheltered the practitioners of incest, arson, and prostitution (as it now shelters the blind man in the cellar) while gulping an all-American diet of Cokes and potato chips.”

“Subtle and often clever . . . . Freek’s cynical message is that people with pointless and barren lives can be kept in a state of joyless euphoria through the ideals epitomized by the television commercial . . . . the play’s greatest virtue is that it is very funny while it addresses these issues”
Rocky Mountain News

“Well worth the visit.”
Denver Post

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
George Freek
515 Douglas St.
Belvidere, Illinois
USA 61008
Ph.: (815) 547-7521
Email: gfreek@juno.com

About the Playwright: George Freek’s plays have been produced by the Organic Theater in Chicago, the Milwaukee Repertory, the West Coast Ensemble in Los Angeles, and the Pittsburgh New Works Festival, as well as the 13th Street Theater, Love Creek Productions, and the Theater-Studio in New York. He has been playwright-in-residence at the New American Theater in Rockford, Southern Methodist University, and Southern Illinois University, and has received grants from the Illinois Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Cellar was first produced by The Changing Scene, Denver, Colorado, in April, 1988.

 

The Count of One by Gary L. Blackwood

Drama/ 3 characters, 1 Man, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: (from The Carmel Pine Cone): “The Count of One concerns Dian, a burned-out hypnotherapist, who evokes John Wilkes Booth from her new patient, Stuart, while he is ‘under.’ At first, she thinks the tranced-out Stuart is simply identifying with the famous assassin, but deeper into the sessions, she begins to realize she is conversing with Booth himself and she becomes privy to some startling information.” Based on a true incident.

The first act of The Count of One may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

The Count of One was first produced by Festival of Firsts at the Carl Cherry Center for the Arts, Carmel, California in October, 2001.

 

 

The Couple Next Door by Donna Hoke

The Couple Next Door

Comedy-Drama/ 4 Characters, 2 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis:
After ten years of marriage, Sadie and Vance are experiencing the all too familiar trials that arise when lovers become parents, job and home responsibilities become never-ending, and alone time becomes scarce. To Sadie’s further frustration, reticent Vance refuses to acknowledge — or discuss — any of them. Next door, demographic equals Janet and Rich have fared much better; their happy marriage is full of passion, love, empathy — and multiple sex partners.

When the ever-ready Rich overhears Vance and “hot burrito” Sadie having wild sex, he’s intrigued, and determines to invite the couple over to test the waters. Janet is also curious, but hesitant: They live so close, what if it goes bad, and why is Rich so insistent? Through a comedic series of events, Sadie and Vance arrive at the Lewis house one Fun Friday, hoping that — as they’ve read on-line — a “just sex” evening of swinging will open up communication and elevate them to a new level of closeness.

All appears to go well . . . until the morning after. At the Nelson house, Janet senses the encounter with their new playmates was a little off, while Rich — dazedly fondling Sadie’s left-behind underwear — feels something is definitely on. At the Lewis’, the experiment has seemingly proved a bust: The couple is barely talking, and it’s clear that Sadie is more pissed at her husband than ever.

In the ensuing days, Janet’s suspicions grow, and Rich visits Sadie to confess that she made him feel something he never has before. While Sadie insists it was “just sex,” Vance gets a cryptic visit from Janet that makes him realize his marriage is on the line. That night, Vance and Sadie bond after he digs deep to reveal his feelings about what happened last Friday, and the two take tentative steps toward reconciliation, which include a new start. Crushed, Rich nonetheless recognizes the need to recommit to his family, albeit with the unsettling knowledge that there might be more to love — and sex — than he’s ever known.

“Playwright Hoke can write: dialogue flows naturally, real people saying real things . . . . the story has verve, it lives and breathes.”
The Buffalo News

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A portion of The Couple Next Door may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, contact the playwright at donna@donnahoke.com

Contact Information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Donna Hoke
71 Towhee Court
East Amherst, NY
USA 14051
Ph.: 973-919-2038
Playwright’s website: donnahoke.com
E-mail: donna@donnahoke.com
Representation: Samara Harris, Robert A. Freedman Dramatic Agency, samara@robertfreedmanagency.com
International: Tonda Marton, The Marton Agency, tonda@martonagency.com, 212-255-1908

About the Playwright: Resident playwright at Road Less Traveled Productions, Donna’s work has been seen in 40 states and on five continents. Plays include THE COUPLE NEXT DOOR (Princess Grace semi-finalist), SAFE (winner of the Todd McNerney, Naatak, and Great Gay Play and Musical Contests), BRILLIANT WORKS OF ART (2016 Kilroys List), and ELEVATOR GIRL (2017 O’Neill finalist). Donna is also a New York Times-published crossword puzzle constructor; author of Neko and the Twiggets, a children’s book; and founder/co-curator of BUA Takes 10: GLBT Short Stories. She has received an Individual Artist Award from the New York State Council on the Arts to develop HEARTS OF STONE, as well as an Artie Award for Outstanding New Play (SEEDS). For three consecutive years, she was named Buffalo’s Best Writer by Artvoice — the only woman to ever receive the designation.

Donna Hoke serves on the Dramatists Guild Council and also as Western New York regional representative. In addition, she is a blogger, and moderator of the 10,000+-member Official Playwrights of Facebook. Recent speaking engagements include Citywrights, Kenyon Playwrights Conference, the Dramatists Guild National Conference, Chicago Dramatists, and a live Dramatists Guild webinar. Her commentary has been seen on #2amt, howlround, The Dramatist, the Official Playwrights of Facebook, the soon-to-be-published Workshopping the New Play, and at donnahoke.com.

The Couple Next Door premiered at The Road Less Traveled Theatre, Buffalo, NY, in September, 2010.

“The play challenges notions of what defines a stable relationship, as neither couple leaves the encounter unchanged. This is not a cautionary tale warning against the evils of swinging; neither does the play condemn the practice. We see characters learn about themselves and learn about their relationships in surprising ways. That is the pleasure of The Couple Next Door.”
Artvoice

The Dog by Valentin Krasnogorov, translated from the Russian by Benjamin Sher

Drama/ 3 Characters, 1 Man, 1 Woman plus 1 additional Woman or Child / Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: A man carrying a little dog walks into an Animal Clinic run by a woman. The dog, adopted and given shelter by the man, has become too much of a burden for him. He demands that she “take care” of it. We quickly find out what that means.

Wanting to save the dog, the woman tries desperately to change his mind. He insists, but then relents. We hear the howling of the dogs in the gas chambers off-stage as the man leaves for the Registration Bureau down the hall.The man returns with his dog. In a hurry to return to his job on the railroad, he again insists that the woman “take care” of his dog. A “love scene” ensues, with the life of the dog hanging in the balance.The Dog moves relentlessly forward towards its horrifying conclusion.

“It’s been several days since I saw The Dog, and my thoughts keep returning to it . . . the play gradually seizes and touches something hidden in the soul.”
– Julia Matafonova, Ural Worker

“My feeling for The Dog has not changed since my first encounter with it several years ago . . . . What I admire it most for is its nobility of spirit, and for the heart that beats so vulnerably within it. There is no hero or villain here. We are them and they are us. We make choices in life, and for better or worse, we turn around one day to discover that our lives may be defined by these choices. There is no right or wrong, there is simply decision and consequence. We justify, we rationalize, and, sometimes, we even believe ourselves.”
– Howard Fishman, Director, American premiere

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:In Russia:
Valentin Fainberg (Krasnogorov)
e-mail: valentin.krasnogorov@gmail.com
Ph.: (812) 492-3701 or (812) 550-2146
website: http://krasnogorov.com/english/In the USA:
Mr. Larry Feinberg
52 Ridge Drive
Livingston, NJ
USA 07039
Ph.: (973) 535-3632
e-mail: seryvolk@yahoo.com

About the Playwright: The name of Valentin Krasnogorov is well known to theater-goers of Russia and other countries. His plays The Real Man, Somebody Must Go Away, Procession of Gnomes, Love Medicine, Several Hours from the Life of a Man and a Woman, Delights of Adultery, Let’s Have Sex!, Small Tragedies, This Weak Tender Sex, Bride’s Room, The Cruel Lesson, and Murder Case are warmly met by critics and audience. He was President of the St. Petersburg Playwrights Association until 1992, and now lives in Israel.

Krasnogorov’s plays are contained in the permanent repertoire of many theatres and are sometimes played several hundreds times. Critics have noted that “Krasnogorov’s plays cross borders easily”; for this reason, many of them have been translated into foreign languages and staged in theatres, on radio, and on TV in different countries.

V. Krasnogorov is a member of the Writers Union of Russia; member of the Russian Union of the Theater Workers; and a member of the Israel Federation of Writers Unions. His biography is included in the dictionaries Marqui’s Who’s Who in the World, USA, International Who’s Who in the Intellectuals, England, Cambridge, et. al..

The Dog was first produced in English by The American Theater Company, New York City, in February, 1998.

The Fall of Don Juan by Valentin Krasnogorov

Comedy-Drama/ 3 characters, 2 males, 1 female/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Circumstances force a bride and groom, also successful business partners, to ask a total stranger — an aging, oddly behaving man — to be the witness at their wedding. To kill time, the young couple also ask him about the women he loved. The result is unexpected, and their accidental meeting dramatically changes the fates of all three.

 

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
In Russia:
Valentin Fainberg (Krasnogorov)
e-mail: valentin.krasnogorov@gmail.com
Ph.: (812) 492-3701 or (812) 550-2146
website: http://krasnogorov.com/english/The translators: Ph.: (1)-917-402-1319 e-mail:YanaSkrynnik@gmail.comDimitriVorontzov@gmail.comIn the USA:
Mr. Larry Feinberg
52 Ridge Drive
Livingston, NJ
USA 07039
Ph.: (973) 535-3632
e-mail: seryvolk@yahoo.com

About the Playwright: The name of Valentin Krasnogorov is well known to theater-goers of Russia and other countries. His plays The Real Man, Somebody Must Go Away,Procession of Gnomes, Love Medicine, Several Hours from the Life of a Man and a Woman, Delights of Adultery, The Dog, Small Tragedies, This Weak Tender Sex, Bride’s Room,The Cruel Lesson, and Murder Case are warmly met by critics and audience. He was President of the St. Petersburg Playwrights Association until 1992, and now lives in Israel.

Krasnogorov’s plays are contained in the permanent repertoire of many theatres and are sometimes played several hundreds times. Critics have noted that “Krasnogorov’s plays cross borders easily”; for this reason, many of them have been translated into foreign languages and staged in theatres, on radio, and on TV in different countries.

V. Krasnogorov is a member of the Writers Union of Russia; member of the Russian Union of the Theater Workers; and a member of the Israel Federation of Writers Unions. His biograghy is included in the dictionaries Marqui’s Who’s Who in the World, USA, International Who’s Who in the Intellectuals, England, Cambridge, et. al..

The Fall of Don Juan was first produced by the Gorky State Theatre, Crimea, Simferopol, Ukraina in October, 2005.

The Goose Girl by Gary L. Blackwood

Drama/ 6 Characters, 3 Men, 3 Women/ One Act

Synopsis: Queen Ysabel of Oldmark sends her daughter, Princess Jorinda, to marry King Ferdinand of Eastphalia, in order to seal an alliance between the two kingdoms. Elsa, an ambitious and devious maid in waiting, leads Jorinda to believe that her future husband is ill-tempered and ill-favored, and convinces the princess to trade roles: Elsa poses as the bride, and Jorinda is given a position as a lowly goose girl. Ferdinand, of course, proves to be neither ill-tempered nor ugly, but Jorinda can’t confess the truth, for fear of endangering the alliance.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

The Goose Girl awaits its first production.

The Great Algonquin by Linda Juanita Stockham

Comedy-Drama/ 4 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: The year is 1951. Emmett Halberg, one of the residents of Mrs. Wirth’s boarding house in a small West Virginia town, is the leading expert on local history, flora, and fauna, but he’s also a little eccentric, and more than a little paranoid about Communism. When a young Korean War veteran moves in, Emmett begins to suspect him of being a spy, and his over-active imagination and outrageous actions soon upset the lives of the residents.

A subtly comic look at distrust and paranoia during the Cold War, with many contemporary parallels, The Great Algonquin was one of three winners in the 2011 West Virginia’s Writers Contest.

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Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
Linda Stockham
CSU San Bernardino
Department of Anthropology
5500 University Parkway
San Bernardino, CA
USA 92407
Playwright’s e-mail: lindastockham@netzero.net
Alternative e-mail: stockham813@hotmail.com

About the Playwright: Linda Juanita Stockham is a cultural anthropologist/playwright. She received a B.A. in Anthropology from California State College San Bernardino and her Interdisciplinary M.A. in Anthropological Studies from California State University San Bernardino. She has had plays produced in New York City and Los Angeles, in various festivals and on the radio. She lives and works in San Bernardino, California.

The Great Algonquin awaits professional production.

The Lost by Julia Britton

Drama/ 1 Characters, 1 Man/ One Act

Synopsis: Queer British writer, Christopher Isherwood relives and reviews his life at Cambridge University and in Nazi Germany, where he wrote the famousBerlin Stories (on which John Van Druten based his play I am a Camera and which was later adapted as the musical and film Cabaret). He is still suffering from the loss of his young German lover, Heinz, whom he failed to rescue from the Nazi authorities.

Playwright’s Notes

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Julia Britton
3 Tiuna Grove
Elwood, Victoria
Australia 3184
Ph.: + 61 3 9531 9395
E-mail: juliabritton@hotmail.com

About the Playwright: Julia Britton graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at La Mama Theatre, St. Martin’s Theatre, Griffin Theatre, The Stage Company (Adelaide), The Blue Room (Perth), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), Theatreworks (Melbourne) with workshops at Playbox Theatre, Budgie Lung (Adelaide) and playreadings at The State Theatre of South Australia, (The Man Who Loved Furs with Geoffrey Rush) and Melbourne Arts Centre (Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End) in conjunction with The Golden Summers Exhibition (Westpac Gallery), Melbourne Theatre Company (Listening to Shells directed by Ron Rogers) and the South Australian Writer’s Theatre. Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia and also performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide. Recently, it was also performed at the Blue Room, Perth Festival and Theatreworks.She has written and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions including: Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea) Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), I’ve Danced with a Girl who Danced with the Prince of Wales (Rippon Lea), Good Morning Midnight! (La Mama), Sunset Children (La Mama), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), Seven Little Australians (Rippon Lea), The Singing Forest (Theatreworks), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne), The Yellow Book (Mietta’s), Perks (Mietta’s), The White Rose and the Blue (Melbourne Town Hall), The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building and The Hong Kong Fringe Festival).She was nominated for a Victorian Green Room Award in 1995 for In Transit. Other plays include: Hello, Last Page of My Life (reading at La Mama), Magdalena Amati (reading at La Mama), Somehow the Times Passes (reading La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), The Purple Kangaroo(reading La Mama), Snake!, A Cloudless Sky (reading at La Mama and Alice Springs), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), The Man Who Loved Furs (reading at La Mama), Internet Baby, (reading at La Mama), Mrs. Bloem (reading at Griffin Theatre), Two Sisters and Rose.

Her music theatre includes: Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron was produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand.

The Lost was first produced by Performing Arts Productions, Melbourne, and later appeared at the Hong Kong Fringe Festival. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; radio: Best Play Award, ABC Queensland; Nomination, Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.