Metastasis: Chain of Ruin by Gordon Pengilly

Tragi-comedy/ 8 Characters, 5 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Named for the pathological spread of live rot through a system, Metastasis sets 25 characters in motion, rippling out from a random drive by shooting, to conjure a world of missed connections and crossed wires.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Gordon Pengilly
401-27th Ave. NW
Calgary, AB, Canada
T2M 2H7
Tel: (403) 277-6572
E-mail: gpengilly@nucleus.com

About the Playwright: Gordon Pengilly has written more than 50 plays for TV, film, radio and the stage. His work, including Seeds, Swipe, Metastasis, Yours ’til The Moon Falls Down, Tom Three Persons, Tom Form And The Speed Of Love, Contraption and They Don’t Call Them Farmers Anymore, has been produced across Canada and abroad. His one-act playThe Work Play, which premiered in New York at the Actor’s Loft in 2000 before being produced in Japan in 2002, was made into a short film seen at Fourth Wall Screenings in 2005.Gordon is also one of the most prolific radio dramatists in Canada. In 1989, CBC selectedThe Ballad Of An Existential Cowboy as one its Best-of-Decade. In The Middle Of Town Stands The Dreamland was nominated for a Peabody Award in 1993 and rebroadcast in Australia, and Seeing In the Dark received the 2007 BBC International Radio Drama Prize and was broadcast on the World Service.

Gordon has been resident playwright for theatres and institutions in Edmonton, Calgary, Banff, Red Deer, Toronto and Fredericton and routinely runs workshops for Alberta Playwrights Network. His first collection of plays, Metastasis And Other Plays, published by NeWest Press received the 2009 W.O. Mitchell Book Prize.

Metastasis: Chain of Ruin was first produced by Northern Light Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta in 1995.

If you prefer, click below to buy a printed copy in the collection Metastasis and Other Plays:
 

Duty by Hal Parrott

Courtney Stephens, Kevin Fewell, Matt Griggs, Kathy Kane, David Crenshaw in 'Duty' at The Theatre Gym, Kansas City, Missouri

Drama/ 8 characters, 5 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Duty explores the challenges and consequences of perceived and real duty.

David Crenshaw is a middle-aged professional who served as a Marine during the Vietnam War, where he received wounds and medals. He and his wife Ellie are both opposed to their son Adam entering the armed forces. They enlist the aid of Roger Melnick, a friend of David’s from his service days, to help dissuade Adam from enlisting.

During these discussions Ellie and David briefly revisit his forgiveness of her infidelity. Points and counterpoints are made about duty to country and duty to politicians.

While Adam is away training, David starts a grass roots peace organization that is dedicated to making friends in the Muslim world. Adam, accompanied by his fiancée Jane, learns of his father’s organization while on leave before being deployed to Afghanistan. David’s efforts prove newsworthy and he, Roger, and Roger’s new Muslim friend Ali are interviewed on a syndicated radio talk show by host Robert Williams.

The radio session is punctuated by differing opinions about David’s peace organization. The program ends with Ali defending the efforts of David and Roger.

After the loss of Adam to combat in Afghanistan and while mourning his death in battle, Ellie accuses David of culpability in their son’s death. The couple disagrees over the concept of obligation. Their argument is colored by Ellie’s infidelity and David’s sense of loyalty to her.

Unable to deal with her bitterness and grief, Ellie leaves David.

A month later, Ali informs David and Roger that a scholarship in Adam’s name has been established at a leading Muslim university. He also asks Roger to speak to a group of Muslims.

After that, David makes his daily pilgrimage to his son’s grave. His father, a wounded World War II Marine veteran, is buried next to Adam. The play ends with David, a decorated veteran of Vietnam, alone, speaking from the heart to his dead father, a decorated veteran of World War II and to his dead son, a decorated Marine who fell in Afghanistan. Three generations of Crenshaws have performed their duty to their country and to their families in their own ways. David acknowledges Adam’s sacrifice to duty and the necessity of that sacrifice.

“Beautifully written.”
– Russ Simmons, Sun Publications

“Compelling . . . A worthwhile evening in the theatre . . . as relevant as tomorrow’s headlines.”
– KC Confidentia

l“A stirring piece of theatre . . . as powerful an ending as I have ever seen.”
– KC Stage

“I have directed or acted in hundreds of plays in 45 years in professional theatre — but I have never been so struck by the power and relevancy of any script as I have been by Hal Parrott’sDuty.
– Art Suskin, Artistic Director of The Theatre Gym

Click here to view more production photos and listen to an interview with playwright Hal Parrott.

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:Amateur and professional rights:
Hal Parrott
8204 NW Forest Drive
Weatherby Lake, Missouri
USA
64512
Email: halparrott@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Hal Parrott has written for newspapers, magazines, TV and radio. Duty is his first play. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri with his wife and daughter.Duty was first produced by The Theatre Gym in Kansas City, Missouri, September, 2010. 

Virgin On Exile by Nwokedi

Drama/ 9 Men, 14 women, plus chorus (villagers) and musicians/ One Act

Synopsis: The village of Ifeatu has been cursed. Villagers have begun to slump over and die, suddenly and quickly. A devastating uncertainty lingers in the air as the leaders of the village search for an answer.

Osakwe, Lead Warrior of Ifeatu Village, is told by an Oracle to find the Virgin on Exile, a woman out in the world. She is to be sacrificed along with seven bulls at the burial place of their progenitor, Ifeatu.

Osakwe realizes the virgin may be someone he knows. Fearful that she will expose a dark secret, he tells the villagers only that the seven bulls must be sacrificed. This, of course, does not change anything. When he is asked if he may have missed something, Osakwe compounds his deception by telling them they must abolish their practice of Mgba Agbogho, an ancient festival.

This is met with resistance. But when the son of a deceased villager returns after years of searching for what he calls “the light,” and tells them the same thing, the villagers are faced with a difficult decision: believe the newly returned villager and abolish their ancient festival, or do nothing and watch as the deaths continue, until they are likely extinct.

Then a goddess appears in the village, and Osakwe’s lie begins to unravel. And when two men bring a madwoman into the square, the even larger secret he has been hiding is finally laid bare.

This extraordinary play from Nigeria combines dance, song, magic, spectacle and audience participation to tell an absorbing tale of a leader’s deceit, and his community’s redemption.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Nwokedi Sylvester Sunday
Address: 38 Mbaise Road Owerri
Imo State
Nigeria
Phone Number: +2347035200002
E-mail: kiddies4unclemorale@yahoo.com

About the Playwright: Nwokedi Sylvester Sunday is an Owerri-based independent film producer and playwright from Anambra State, Nigeria. He has a degree in Theatre Arts. His movies, aimed at children and youth, include Mr. Math, Mr. Book, Think Twice, and Olaoma. Sylvester also writes poems and articles, and has spoken at international and national conferences.

Virgin on Exile was first produced by the Crusaders Theatre Troupe at the Rosy Arts Theatre, Owerri Imo State, Nigeria in October 2006.

Mothers Have Nine Lives By Joanna Alexandra Norland

Mothers Have Nine Lives

Comedy-Drama/ 12 characters, 1 to 12 female actors/ One Act

Synopsis:
Kim needs a double stroller for her twin daughter. Now. Marge jetsets from the boardroom to the nursery, and back. Double time. And Kim will convince the powers-that-be that her daughter deserves a place in the gifted students class. Fasten your seatbelts for a 45-minute whistle stop tour of the highs and lows of modern motherhood. Nine mothers, nine monologues, and nine stories, interlinked by the games of three girls who know one thing for sure: Being the mommy is the best part.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Joanna Alexandra Norland
3 Back Lane
Godden Green, Kent
UK, TN15 OJH
Tel: 011 44 (0) 1732 761 864
E-mail: joanna.norland@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Joanna Alexandra Norland’s one-act play Mothers Have Nine Livespremiered in the 1992 Young Playwrights Festival at Playwrights Horizons in new York. The script has since received productions at various London venues including the Bridewell Theatre, in 2002, and the Tabard Theatre, in 2007. Joanna’s work has also been showcased in London at Soho Theatre, Hampstead Theatre, and the Theatre Museum. Her short play, Lydia Reconsiders, which champions Lydia Bennet, the black sheep of Pride and Prejudice, was selected as a finalist in the 2004 National Ten-Minute Play Contest sponsored by the Actors Theatre of Louisville.Her first full-length play, Lizzy, Darcy and Jane (originally entitled Jane Austen Makes a Match) premiered at the Bath Jane Austen Festival in 2006, and was produced by the C Company at the Tabard Theatre, London in 2008. It is published on ProPlay and by Samuel French Ltd.Joanna has a B.A. from Brown University, Rhode Island, an M.Phil. from King’s College, Cambridge, and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She lives in Kent, England.

Mothers Have Nine Lives was first produced by Playwrights Horizon, New York City in 1992.

Cycle by Joanna Alexandra Norland

Cycle at Maltings Arts Theatre, St. Albens, Herts, England

Drama/ 4 Characters, 1 Man, 3 Women/ One Act, 15 Minutes

Synopsis:
Stuart and Veronica are adamant that their mid-terrace neighbour, Julia, must not wheel her bike across their backyard to access the road. Julia appears sympathetic to their concerns — but the couple soon discovers that, when it comes to their pole-dancing neighbour, things are rarely as they appear. Could Julia possibly be plotting an end-terrace takeover?

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Joanna Alexandra Norland
3 Back Lane
Godden Green, Kent
UK, TN15 OJH
Tel: 011 44 (0) 1732 761 864
E-mail: joanna.norland@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Joanna Alexandra Norland’s one-act play Mothers Have Nine Livespremiered in the 1992 Young Playwrights Festival at Playwrights Horizons in new York. The script has since received productions at various London venues including the Bridewell Theatre, in 2002, and the Tabard Theatre, in 2007. Joanna’s work has also been showcased in London at Soho Theatre, Hampstead Theatre, and the Theatre Museum. Her short play, Lydia Reconsiders, which champions Lydia Bennet, the black sheep of Pride and Prejudice, was selected as a finalist in the 2004 National Ten-Minute Play Contest sponsored by the Actors Theatre of Louisville.Her first full-length play, Lizzy, Darcy and Jane (originally entitled Jane Austen Makes a Match) premiered at the Bath Jane Austen Festival in 2006, and was produced by the C Company at the Tabard Theatre, London in 2008. It is published on ProPlay and by Samuel French Ltd.Joanna has a B.A. from Brown University, Rhode Island, an M.Phil. from King’s College, Cambridge, and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She lives in Kent, England.

Cycle was first produced at the Maltings Arts Theatre, St. Albens, Herts, England, in 2012 (Director: Paula Chitty, Irrational Theatre)

 

Weather by Frank Moher

Weather, Alberta Theatre Projects, Calgary

Drama/ 6 Characters, 3 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Act One of Weather may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. For a complete reading copy, see the Contact Info on this page

Synopsis (From the Calgary Herald): “Peter is a 43-year-old architect whose pet project is Water’s Edge, a new, upscale halfway house, which when finished will be a comfortable home for schizophrenics, including his own adult son, Chris.

“In fact, Peter is gay and lives with Drew, an actor-cum-AIDS volunteer; Chris is the result of a brief heterosexual liaison in his teens. Chris’s Mom, Elizabeth, is now a politically influential lawyer and is also trying to smooth the way for the government-funded Water’s Edge. As he waits for his home to be completed, Chris is living temporarily in a basement suite with his new girlfriend and fellow schizophrenic, Tara.

“Then, like the crazy, end-of-millennium weather that is the play’s meteorological metaphor, this sunny scenario abruptly changes for the worse. The province cancels the project for budgetary reasons, Chris and Tara, evicted from their suite, seek refuge in a squalid squat run by the radical mental-health advocate Yvonne and go off their medication. And Peter suddenly finds himself gripped by a black, angry mood he can’t shake.”

“Cause for a celebration.”
– American Theatre Magazine

“Brilliant . . . . Although about a serious subject, Weather has a surprisingly upbeat feel.”
– The Calgary Sun

Weather delivers the talk [and] walks the walk, offering Tara, Christopher and Peter as complex, funny and sympathetic characters, human beings working their way through a difficult world.”
– The (Toronto) Globe and Mail

Weather is a play that never loses sight of its characters nor sacrifices them for the sake of the playwright’s destination. Like life, this play is tragic, funny and optimistic.”
– Fast Forward Weekly

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Single Lane Entertainment,
650 Little Blvd.,
Gabriola Island, B.C.,
Canada,
V0R 1X3.
Ph.: (in North America) 1-855-757-9216 or 250-247-9216
Email: info@singlelane.com
Playwright’s website: FrankMoher.com

About the Playwright: Frank Moher’s plays have been produced internationally, at theatres including South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, Calif.), Detroit Repertory Theatre, Round House Theatre (Silver Spring, Maryland), the Canadian Stage Company (Toronto), the Wellington Repertory Theatre (Wellington, New Zealand), Workshop West Theatre (Edmonton, Alta.), the Asolo Theater (Sarasota, Fla.), Alberta Theatre Projects (Calgary), Dodona Theatre (Prishtina, Kosova), The Mingei Theatre (Tokyo), and OmaDa Theatre (Athens, Greece). He has won a Los Angeles Drama-Logue Award for Writing (for Odd Jobs), the Edmonton Sterling Award for Outstanding New Play (for both The Third Ascent and Prairie Report,), and is published by both ProPlay and the Playwrights Guild of Canada.

Frank has taught at the University of British Columbia and the University of Alberta (where he was a Distinguished Visiting Artist), and is currently an instructor in scriptwriting and journalism at Vancouver Island University. He has also worked professionally as a literary manager and dramaturg, and writes regularly for various magazines and newspapers, including backofthebook.ca. His most recent play, Big Baby, has been seen in Calgary, Los Angeles, and widely in Europe, and a musical, Moonbound!, with music co-written by Antonio Gradanti, which premiered in 2014, is now available on ProPlay.

Weather was premiered by Alberta Theatre Projects in January, 1999. It has been revised for publication by ProPlay.

Also by Frank Moher on ProPlay:

 

 

The Third Ascent by Frank Moher

Drama/ 7 characters, 6 Men, 1 male child / Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis (from Southam News): “Henry Lewis Stimson was U.S. Secretary of War to presidents Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman. He was also a pivotal figure in the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

“But these facts make up only one crucial strand in The Third Ascent . . . . What also fascinates Moher — and this provides the provocative philosophical basis for his play — is the fact that Stimson was the first white man to climb Chief Mountain, a foreboding and mythic peak on the Alberta-Montana border . . . . On the mountain, Stimson finds himself forced to confront the truth of his own role in the Hiroshima bombings. And if he hopes that the climb to the top of Chief Mountain will provide a kind of absolution, of spiritual cleansing, he is tragically mistaken.

The Third Ascent is first and foremost a character study, a compassionate examination of moral fallibility. ‘I am not the government incarnate,’ protests the aging Stimson at one critical point. ‘I am only one man.’ But Stimson’s long-time Indian guide, Thomas Whitefeather, also makes compromises. At one point, he bitterly denounces the aging statesman for his complicity in the Hiroshima bombing . . . . At the next, he ruefully confesses he now guides ordinary people to the summit in order to make money.

“Various concerns surface in this richly textured and absorbing play — the immorality of war, obviously, but also such matters as human guilt and expiation, the sinister workings of racism, the mysterious influence of legend on even the most pragmatic of civilizations, and the fragility of human certainty.”

“An unusually powerful play . . . heartfelt, intelligent . . . Frank Moher is a playwright to be treasured.”
– Southam News

“Moher’s most flamboyantly theatrical show yet . . . thoughtful and touching.”
– The Edmonton Sun

“Taut and funny and wrenching . . . The best Moher yet. Don’t miss it.”
– The Edmonton Journal

“A challenging work about major issues . . . It shows that the singular maturity and unique viewpoint of Odd Jobs were not a flash in the pan.”
– The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

“Stimulates the heart and mind . . . a satisfying, powerful play.”
– Saskatoon Star-Phoenix

“Extraordinary . . . riveting.”
– CHEZ-FM (Ottawa)“Theatricality and thought are the Siamese twins of good theatre and The Third Ascent is rich in both. A must see.”
– The Chronicle-Journal (Thunder Bay)

“Frank Moher’s plays are always highly imaginative, skillfully crafted, thought-provoking . . . . The Third Ascent is [his] most ambitious and powerful.”
– Canadian Theatre Review

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Single Lane Entertainment,
650 Little Blvd.,
Gabriola Island, B.C.,
Canada,
V0R 1X3.
Ph.: (in North America) 1-855-757-9216 or 250-247-9216
Email: info@singlelane.com
Playwright’s website: FrankMoher.com

About the Playwright: Frank Moher’s plays have been produced internationally, at theatres including South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, Calif.), Detroit Repertory Theatre, Round House Theatre (Silver Spring, Maryland), the Canadian Stage Company (Toronto), the Wellington Repertory Theatre (Wellington, New Zealand), Workshop West Theatre (Edmonton, Alta.), the Asolo Theater (Sarasota, Fla.), Alberta Theatre Projects (Calgary), Dodona Theatre (Prishtina, Kosova), The Mingei Theatre (Tokyo), and OmaDa Theatre (Athens, Greece). He has won a Los Angeles Drama-Logue Award for Writing (for Odd Jobs), the Edmonton Sterling Award for Outstanding New Play (for both The Third Ascent and Prairie Report,), and is published by both ProPlay and the Playwrights Guild of Canada.

Frank has taught at the University of British Columbia and the University of Alberta (where he was a Distinguished Visiting Artist), and is currently an instructor in scriptwriting and journalism at Vancouver Island University. He has also worked professionally as a literary manager and dramaturg, and writes regularly for various magazines and newspapers, including backofthebook.ca. His most recent play, Big Baby, has been seen in Calgary, Los Angeles, and widely in Europe, and a musical, Moonbound!, with music co-written by Antonio Gradanti, which premiered in 2014, is now available on ProPlay.

The Third Ascent was premiered by Theatre Network, Edmonton, Alberta, in January, 1988.

Also by Frank Moher on ProPlay:

Odd Jobs by Frank Moher

Odd Jobs, Theatre Network, Edmonton, Alberta

Drama/ 3 Characters, 2 Women, 1 Man/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis (From the Los Angeles Times): “Tim is a Canadian assembly line cowboy smarting from having been laid off and replaced by a robotic arm. Mrs. Phipps is an elderly former mathematics professor for whom Tim offers to do the odd jobs of the title. And Ginette is Tim’s French-Canadian wife, whose determined self-improvement wins her a way out of the complaints department at Sears (where she works) and into the higher-paying realm of systems analyst.

“Snags develop when these three people’s needs intersect and their universes don’t, trapping Tim like a hypotenuse between the women.

“Sounds like just another drama of family conflict? The difference comes in the depth of field, the shifts of each gravitational pull and the frequent lyricism of Moher’s writing (lyrical but not mawkish).

“If Ginette takes the new job, it will require that she and Tim move to another town. But Tim has inadvertently become more necessary to Mrs. Phipps’ well-being than he intended — and she to his . . . . The dilemma that threatens their interdependency calls into question everything each one of them believes.”

International praise for
Odd Jobs:
“A penetrating look at a human triangle . . . eloquent, engrossing, and lean.”
– Los Angeles Times

Odd Jobs is only odd in the unexpected riches it contains. And Frank Moher is a name to get to know, eh?”
– Washington Times

“Whimsically humorous . . . a little gem of a play.”
– Baltimore Evening Sun

“A rare find – a play that is as moving and insightful as it is entertaining.”
– Ottawa Citizen

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Single Lane Entertainment,
650 Little Blvd.,
Gabriola Island, B.C.,
Canada,
V0R 1X3.
Ph.: (in North America) 1-855-757-9216 or 250-247-9216
Email: info@singlelane.com
Playwright’s website: FrankMoher.com

About the Playwright: Frank Moher’s plays have been produced internationally, at theatres including South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, Calif.), Detroit Repertory Theatre, Round House Theatre (Silver Spring, Maryland), the Canadian Stage Company (Toronto), the Wellington Repertory Theatre (Wellington, New Zealand), Workshop West Theatre (Edmonton, Alta.), the Asolo Theater (Sarasota, Fla.), Alberta Theatre Projects (Calgary), Dodona Theatre (Prishtina, Kosova), The Mingei Theatre (Tokyo), and OmaDa Theatre (Athens, Greece). He has won a Los Angeles Drama-Logue Award for Writing (for Odd Jobs), the Edmonton Sterling Award for Outstanding New Play (for both The Third Ascent and Prairie Report,), and is published by both ProPlay and the Playwrights Guild of Canada. Frank has taught at the University of British Columbia and the University of Alberta (where he was a Distinguished Visiting Artist), and is currently an instructor in scriptwriting and journalism at Vancouver Island University. He has also worked professionally as a literary manager and dramaturg, and writes regularly for various magazines and newspapers, includingbackofthebook.ca. His most recent play, Big Baby, has been seen in Calgary, Los Angeles, and widely in Europe, and a musical, Moonbound!, with music co-written by Antonio Gradanti, which premiered in 2014, is now available on ProPlay.

Odd Jobs was premiered by Theatre Network and Catalyst Theatre, Edmonton, in November, 1985.

Also by Frank Moher on ProPlay:

“In Odd Jobs, the proposal that experiencing art should leave you at least a little wiser, a little richer is as sound and real as a heartbeat.”
– Winnipeg Free Press

“A soft-spoken, tender drama . . . skillfully drawn.”
– Indianapolis Star

“Deceptively simple .. . quietly absorbing.”
– The Irish Times