Crystal by Fred Rohan Vargas

Drama/ 4 Characters, 3 Men, 1 Woman (teens)/ Full Length, 85 minutes

Synopsis: Set in a suburban community of eastern Pennsylvania, Crystal takes place in an abandoned woodshed, circa 1981. Andy, 17, has left the body of a 16-year-old girl under the floor. Hoping to gain status with two close friends, Ralph and Joey, he brings them to view the body. When they return the next day, however, the hole under the floor is empty, and Crystal, the girl, appears soiled and livid from outside.

What follows is an intense and gritty character study of teens whose behavior is a mirror of the chaotic world outside the shed. Overweight and insecure, Andy takes out his frustrations on the women around him; Ralph hides his pain at his brother’s death behind a thickening emotional wall; Joey will do almost anything to dispel his all-American boy image; and Crystal’s search for love leads instead to violence. Insightful, compassionate, Crystal provides a startling glimpse into four desperate young lives.

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Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Fred Rohan Vargas
E-mail: rohanvargas@aol.com
Website: www.miuprod.com

About the Playwright: Fred Rohan Vargas is the author of several full lengths, one acts and children’s plays that have been produced throughout the country and abroad. He holds a MFA in dramatic writing from New York University. Two of his plays have been published by The Riant Theatre (Anything But Black) and JAC Publishing and Promotions (Crystal). He is founder and executive producer of Mixing It Up Productions, LLC. He has received three nominations for his play Tide Beyond the Rift at the Midtown International Theatre Festival (2014) and has had his play Crystal produced in Bucharest, Romania the same year. As a producer, Fred has just finished a  three month run at the 13th Street Repertory Theatre of his children’s musical, Yaki Yim Bamboo the Musical.

Fred also shows his ability in other genres by writing instrumental pieces for jazz, film and TV. A renaissance artist in the making, he has been noted by Song of the Year Songwriting Contest, Unisong International Song Writing Contest, Billboard World Song Contest, John Lennon Songwriters Contest and Great American Song Contest. His music is on a compilation of 3 CDs.

Fred has served on the theatre/dance grant’s panel for the Queens Council on the Arts, the panel of judges for the Daytime Emmy Awards (sponsored by The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences) and the Board of Directors of the New York Children’s Theatre. He is currently a member of The Broadway League, Theatre Resource Unlimited, The Dramatists Guild and The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

Crystal was first produced by The Latino Experimental Fantastic Theatre (L.E.F.T.) at The Clemente Solo Velez Cultural Center, New York City in January, 2001.

Cycle by Joanna Alexandra Norland

Cycle at Maltings Arts Theatre, St. Albens, Herts, England

Drama/ 4 Characters, 1 Man, 3 Women/ One Act, 15 Minutes

Synopsis:
Stuart and Veronica are adamant that their mid-terrace neighbour, Julia, must not wheel her bike across their backyard to access the road. Julia appears sympathetic to their concerns — but the couple soon discovers that, when it comes to their pole-dancing neighbour, things are rarely as they appear. Could Julia possibly be plotting an end-terrace takeover?

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Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Joanna Alexandra Norland
3 Back Lane
Godden Green, Kent
UK, TN15 OJH
Tel: 011 44 (0) 1732 761 864
E-mail: joanna.norland@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Joanna Alexandra Norland’s one-act play Mothers Have Nine Livespremiered in the 1992 Young Playwrights Festival at Playwrights Horizons in new York. The script has since received productions at various London venues including the Bridewell Theatre, in 2002, and the Tabard Theatre, in 2007. Joanna’s work has also been showcased in London at Soho Theatre, Hampstead Theatre, and the Theatre Museum. Her short play, Lydia Reconsiders, which champions Lydia Bennet, the black sheep of Pride and Prejudice, was selected as a finalist in the 2004 National Ten-Minute Play Contest sponsored by the Actors Theatre of Louisville.Her first full-length play, Lizzy, Darcy and Jane (originally entitled Jane Austen Makes a Match) premiered at the Bath Jane Austen Festival in 2006, and was produced by the C Company at the Tabard Theatre, London in 2008. It is published on ProPlay and by Samuel French Ltd.Joanna has a B.A. from Brown University, Rhode Island, an M.Phil. from King’s College, Cambridge, and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She lives in Kent, England.

Cycle was first produced at the Maltings Arts Theatre, St. Albens, Herts, England, in 2012 (Director: Paula Chitty, Irrational Theatre)

 

Dark Horse by Gary L Blackwood

Drama/ 13 Characters, 11 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Missouri, 1837. The circuit judge of Crawford County has summoned a grand jury to hear the case of Mary, a slave accused of beating and drowning her master’s two-year-old child. Phillip Cole, a transplanted Bostonian with a cold and calculating manner, has volunteered to defend the girl, over the objections of his bigoted partner, who is sure they don’t have a chance of winning. In Missouri, a slave is not even permitted to testify against a white man.

Cole is more optimistic. A trial, he says, is like a chess game; sometimes all you have to do is wait for your opponent to make a wrong move. His confidence is shaken when Mary refuses even to tell her side of the story. To add to his troubles, the foolish and incompetent circuit attorney is assigned to work with him. Stereger, the prosecuting attorney, seems willing to stoop to anything that will further his case, and Judge Evans is more concerned with having a speedy trial than a fair one.

With no witnesses for the defense, Cole relies on clever cross examining– what he calls “fishing.” He uncovers some damaging facts. First he learns that two days passed between the time the child died and the time the sheriff was summoned. Second, he finds that the child’s father was known to have beaten both Mary and the child.

Gradually the defense’s case grows stronger. Even Mary begins to display a little hope, and reveals the truth to Cole: She lost her temper and beat the child, then locked the little girl in the springhouse, where she drowned.

Afraid of losing, Stereger calls a new witness who testifies– falsely– that shortly before the murder he saw Mary beat the child and threaten to drown her. Frustrated, Cole asks the judge to let Mary speak on her own behalf. The request is denied. After only a few minutes’ deliberation, the jury finds Mary guilty. The judge sentences her to hang. Mary can forgive them, because she never expected any more from them. It’s Cole she can’t forgive. He gave her hope, and then it was snatched away again.

Cole promises to get her an appeal and a new trial, but she knows it’s no use. She holds no hope for an afterlife, either. “If they is one,” she says, “I ‘spect it’s just for white folks, too.”

An excerpt from Dark Horse may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

Dark Horse was first produced by Ferndale Repertory Theatre, Ferndale, California in March, 1993.

Duty by Hal Parrott

Courtney Stephens, Kevin Fewell, Matt Griggs, Kathy Kane, David Crenshaw in 'Duty' at The Theatre Gym, Kansas City, Missouri

Drama/ 8 characters, 5 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Duty explores the challenges and consequences of perceived and real duty.

David Crenshaw is a middle-aged professional who served as a Marine during the Vietnam War, where he received wounds and medals. He and his wife Ellie are both opposed to their son Adam entering the armed forces. They enlist the aid of Roger Melnick, a friend of David’s from his service days, to help dissuade Adam from enlisting.

During these discussions Ellie and David briefly revisit his forgiveness of her infidelity. Points and counterpoints are made about duty to country and duty to politicians.

While Adam is away training, David starts a grass roots peace organization that is dedicated to making friends in the Muslim world. Adam, accompanied by his fiancée Jane, learns of his father’s organization while on leave before being deployed to Afghanistan. David’s efforts prove newsworthy and he, Roger, and Roger’s new Muslim friend Ali are interviewed on a syndicated radio talk show by host Robert Williams.

The radio session is punctuated by differing opinions about David’s peace organization. The program ends with Ali defending the efforts of David and Roger.

After the loss of Adam to combat in Afghanistan and while mourning his death in battle, Ellie accuses David of culpability in their son’s death. The couple disagrees over the concept of obligation. Their argument is colored by Ellie’s infidelity and David’s sense of loyalty to her.

Unable to deal with her bitterness and grief, Ellie leaves David.

A month later, Ali informs David and Roger that a scholarship in Adam’s name has been established at a leading Muslim university. He also asks Roger to speak to a group of Muslims.

After that, David makes his daily pilgrimage to his son’s grave. His father, a wounded World War II Marine veteran, is buried next to Adam. The play ends with David, a decorated veteran of Vietnam, alone, speaking from the heart to his dead father, a decorated veteran of World War II and to his dead son, a decorated Marine who fell in Afghanistan. Three generations of Crenshaws have performed their duty to their country and to their families in their own ways. David acknowledges Adam’s sacrifice to duty and the necessity of that sacrifice.

“Beautifully written.”
– Russ Simmons, Sun Publications

“Compelling . . . A worthwhile evening in the theatre . . . as relevant as tomorrow’s headlines.”
– KC Confidentia

l“A stirring piece of theatre . . . as powerful an ending as I have ever seen.”
– KC Stage

“I have directed or acted in hundreds of plays in 45 years in professional theatre — but I have never been so struck by the power and relevancy of any script as I have been by Hal Parrott’sDuty.
– Art Suskin, Artistic Director of The Theatre Gym

Click here to view more production photos and listen to an interview with playwright Hal Parrott.

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Contact information:Amateur and professional rights:
Hal Parrott
8204 NW Forest Drive
Weatherby Lake, Missouri
USA
64512
Email: halparrott@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Hal Parrott has written for newspapers, magazines, TV and radio. Duty is his first play. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri with his wife and daughter.Duty was first produced by The Theatre Gym in Kansas City, Missouri, September, 2010. 

ESL by Tom Smith

Drama/ 4 characters, 2 males, 2 females/ One Act

Synopsis: Trey has been doing poorly in his Spanish class, so his father has hired Ofelia to be his tutor. Throughout the course of many weeks, Trey slowly finds himself becoming attracted to Ofelia, despite his recent and rocky relationship with his girlfriend, Jackie. But when Trey confronts Ofelia about her cousin Jesús’s lack of English, they must grapple with the issues of multiculturalism, Americanism, and language. And when a hate crime is committed against Jesús at school, everyone must examine their own feelings of racism in this bilingual drama.

A portion of ESL may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information on this page.

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Contact information:Amateur and professional rights:
YouthPLAYS
7119 W Sunset Blvd #390
Los Angeles, CA
USA 90046
E-mail: info@youthplays.com
Website: www.youthplays.com

About the Playwright: Tom Smith’s published plays include The Wild and Wacky Rhyming Stories of Miss Henrietta Humpledowning, ESL, What Comes Around, A Christmas Caroland Johnny and Sally Ann… (YouthPLAYS), Marguerita’s Secret Diary (Baker’s Plays);Gray (Original Works Online); and The Pathmaker, Comedy of Errors (editor), Much Ado About Nothing (editor), Two Gentlemen of Verona (editor), and Love’s Labour’s Lost (editor) for Encore Performance Publishing as well as Dangerous, The Odyssey and Drinking Habits, published by Playscripts. His other plays have received productions both nationally and internationally. Tom is the recipient of the Robert J. Pickering Award for Excellence in Playwriting, the ATHE Playworks Award, the Orlin R. Corey Outstanding Regional Playwright Award, the Richard Odlin Award, a Seattle Footlights Award, and has been a selected participant in numerous playwriting festivals across the country. He is a proud member of the Dramatists Guild. Website: www.tomsmithplaywright.com.

ESL was frst produced by Creede Repertory Theatre (Creede, CO), 2005.

Excavations by Eugene Stickland

Comedy-Drama/ 4 Characters, 3 Men, 1 Woman, 1 Pianist/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Imagine if David Lynch or Franz Kafka travelled deep into the coulees of Saskatchewan and gave us their warped insight into modern day palaeontology. A palaeontologist, a landowner, a defrocked minister, and his sister are linked through the discovery and subsequent excavation of a T-Rex dinosaur.

This new play by Eugene Stickland (A Guide to Mourning and Midlife) is a bold prairie gothic exploring the virtues of science vs. religion, procreation vs. extinction, and our search for meaningful relationships.

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Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Eugene Stickland
Calgary, AB
Canada
T2T 0M8
Ph.: (403) 244-8941
E-mail: eugenius@telusplanet.net
Website: http://eugenestickland.com/

About the Playwright: Eugene Stickland began writing plays following the completion of his M.F.A. at York University in 1984. Ten years later, at Alberta Theatre Projects playRites ’94, his play Some Assembly Required received its premiere production. Since then, the play has had 15 productions around Canada and the US. It was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award for Drama in 1995. During his tenure as Playwright-in-Residence at ATP, Eugene went on to write Sitting on Paradise (1996), A Guide to Mourning (1998), Appetite (2000) and Midlife (2002).

Excavations was first produced by Theatre Network at The Roxy Theatre in Edmonton, Alberta, opening October 2, 2002.

Fateville by Gary L. Blackwood

Drama/ 8 Characters, 6 Men, 2 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: After Arly Banks, sick of living in poverty, runs off with a traveling book seller, his parents are determined not to let the same thing happen again. In an attempt to make life better for their daughter, Bonnie, they take to murdering travelers for their money and keep the girl a virtual prisoner in the house.

But then a handsome young stranger from St. Louis, stranded there in a storm, threatens to steal her away. The parents do him in, only to discover that he was their long-lost son. The story is based on an Ozark folk tale.

 

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

Fateville awaits its first production.

Flowers In The Desert by Donna Hoke

"Flowers in the Desert"
Comedy-Drama/ 2 Characters, 1 Man, 1 Woman/ One Act

Synopsis: After 14 years of marriage, Britt and Joe called it quits, so Joe is surprised when, three years later, Britt asks him to try again. Cheater Joe still loves his ex and their boys, so he’s willing to go along with date-nights and counseling — until he realizes that Britt has a very specific agenda.

“Passionate, thought-provoking and extremely truthful.” – Marina Lai, Delano Luxembourg

Semi-Finalist, Theatre 503 Playwriting Award, Theatre 503, 2016

Semi-Finalist, AACT New Play Contest, American Association of Community Theaters, 2013

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A portion of Flowers In The Desert may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, contact the playwright at donna@donnahoke.com

Contact Information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Donna Hoke
71 Towhee Court
East Amherst, NY
USA 14051
Ph.: 973-919-2038
Playwright’s website: donnahoke.com
E-mail: donna@donnahoke.com
Representation: Samara Harris, Robert A. Freedman Dramatic Agency, samara@robertfreedmanagency.com
International: Tonda Marton, The Marton Agency, tonda@martonagency.com, 212-255-1908

About the Playwright: Resident playwright at Road Less Traveled Productions, Donna’s work has been seen in 40 states and on five continents. Plays include THE COUPLE NEXT DOOR (Princess Grace semi-finalist), SAFE (winner of the Todd McNerney, Naatak, and Great Gay Play and Musical Contests), BRILLIANT WORKS OF ART (2016 Kilroys List), and ELEVATOR GIRL (2017 O’Neill finalist). Donna is also a New York Times-published crossword puzzle constructor; author of Neko and the Twiggets, a children’s book; and founder/co-curator of BUA Takes 10: GLBT Short Stories. She has received an Individual Artist Award from the New York State Council on the Arts to develop HEARTS OF STONE, as well as an Artie Award for Outstanding New Play (SEEDS). For three consecutive years, she was named Buffalo’s Best Writer by Artvoice — the only woman to ever receive the designation.

Donna Hoke serves on the Dramatists Guild Council and also as Western New York regional representative. In addition, she is a blogger, and moderator of the 10,000+-member Official Playwrights of Facebook. Recent speaking engagements include Citywrights, Kenyon Playwrights Conference, the Dramatists Guild National Conference, Chicago Dramatists, and a live Dramatists Guild webinar. Her commentary has been seen on #2amt, howlround, The Dramatist, the Official Playwrights of Facebook, the soon-to-be-published Workshopping the New Play, and at donnahoke.com.

Gina and Fidel by Zsolt Pozsgai

Gina and Fidel

Comedy-Drama/ 1 Man, 1 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: In 1974, in “the capital city of an island nation,” the actress Gina Lollobrigida is determined to make a documentary about Fidel Castro. But interviewing a man who is the constant target of assassination attempts is no easy matter. Gina and Fidel is inspired by the author’s personal acquaintance with Lollobrigida and the stories she told of her meeting with the Cuban leader.

 

 

 

 

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Zsolt Pozsgai
H-7630 Pécs, Tétény u. 28.
Ph.: 00-36-30-2791324

About the Playwright: Award-winning dramatist Zsolt Pozsgai’s plays have been seen worldwide. He is a winner of the European Drama Award, and three-time winner of the Hungarian Playwright’s Competition. Liselotte in May, his most performed play, premiered at the Deutsches Theater, Budapest, Hungary, in May, 2002 and has since been seen in over 22 stagings from New York City to Geneva, Switzerland to Vancouver, Canada. By the end of 2014, 57 of Pozsgai’s pieces, including tragedies, comedies, farces, and plays with music, had been performed in 87 theatres. He has also worked widely as a stage director, and as a writer and director for film and TV.

Gina and Fidel was first produced at the Theatre of Satire in Sofia, Bulgaria in April, 2016.

Girl At Her Mirror by Alan Rossett

Comedy-Drama/ 1 Character, played by 2 Women/ Full Length, 80 minutes

Synopsis:
Who hasn’t dreamed of looking in a mirror and seeing the person one once was . . . or the one who’s waiting ahead.

Two actresses, one young, one old, trace the journey of Olivia, from her conventional beginnings in the French provinces, through her tumultous collisions with the art world . . . her first affair with a macho cubist . . . her marriage to a portraitist specialising in beautiful women . . . the Paradise that turns into Hell for both of them.

Adorable? Deplorable? Scheming? Generous? At the age of 70, she’s lost nothing of her cutting edge. On a live TV show, she reveals all her truths, all her secrets . . . and those of everybody else!

“A very moving evening in the theatre, a must-see.”
– Théâtreauteur

“Light, funny and utterly charming . . . the essence of Alan Rossett.”
– FR 3

“A lovely comedy . . . The author humorously traces two faces of the same woman to which two actresses lend moving reflections.”
– Dumas Theatre

“Tenderly but sardonically the author gets to the roots of one woman’s destiny, from the 1950’s to the present.”
– Direct Matin

“A gripping play bristling with truth.”
– Théâtre contemoprain.tv

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Alan Rossett
91, rue Nollet
75017 Paris
France
Ph.: (33) (0) 1 42 63 98 14
E-mail: rossdoal@aol.com

About the Playwright: “Cocteau meets Woody Allen” was film-director Jean Delannoy’s comment on Alan Rossett, the only American to have French language plays produced regularly in France . . . and to receive awards from the Centre National des Lettres. Born in Detroit, he began his career as an actor in New York, where he appeared for a season with the Living Theatre and also as James Earl Jones’ first Iago. Relocating in Paris, he wrote and directed an evocation of Montmartre Light and Shade with Charles Boyer. Then his comedy High Time went from London to Sydney to New York (at the Actors Studio) and wound up, translated, in a Parisian cafe theatre before transferring to La Bruyere, a Broadway category house.

Rossett made the language cross-over into French with two plays set in restaurants which he staged in the midst of diners at a show biz hang-out, running 200 performances. Many other productions followed of his French-language plays, including How It Happened, Cat As Cat Can, Love On Ice, Calamity Jane. Au Pair Girls premiered in Paris and was revived successfully at the Avignon Festival where it was nominated for a PIAF as comedy of the year.

His French plays are published by Avant-Scene Theatre, Editions des quatre-vents, Editions Art et Comedie et Librairie Theatrale. He has adapted into English many of his own works as well as a series of plays by colleagues that have received grants from the Beaumarchais Association of the French Author’s Society. Rossett has done English versions as well of Alain Decaux’s historical pagaents (Chateau Blois Comes To Life and De Gaulle: the Man Who Said NO. As an actor, he has appeared in films of Marcel Carné, Woody Allen, and over 50 others.

Girl at her Mirror was first produced at the Comédie Nation, Paris, France in 2009, prior to an extensive tour.