A Christmas Carol by Tom Smith

A Christmas Carol

Drama with Music/ 5+ males, 5+ females (10-35+ performers possible)/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: An enchanting adaptation of Dickens’ classic tale of Ebenezer Scrooge and his redemption from a life of greed and sadness. When four ghosts visit Scrooge, he is forced to look at his life-past, present and future-and witness the effect he has on others. A “play with music,” the script includes four songs.

Most of A Christmas Carol may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information on this page.

Published by arrangement with YouthPLAYS

 

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
YouthPLAYS
7119 W Sunset Blvd #390
Los Angeles, CA
USA 90046
E-mail: info@youthplays.com
Website: www.youthplays.com

About the Playwright: Tom Smith’s published plays include The Wild and Wacky Rhyming Stories of Miss Henrietta Humpledowning, ESL, What Comes Around, A Christmas Carol and Johnny and Sally Ann… (YouthPLAYS);Marguerita’s Secret Diary (Baker’s Plays); Gray (Original Works Online); andThe Pathmaker, Comedy of Errors (editor), Much Ado About Nothing (editor),Two Gentlemen of Verona (editor), and Love’s Labour’s Lost (editor) for Encore Performance Publishing as well as Dangerous, The Odyssey and Drinking Habits, published by Playscripts. His other plays have received productions both nationally and internationally. Tom is the recipient of the Robert J. Pickering Award for Excellence in Playwriting, the ATHE Playworks Award, the Orlin R. Corey Outstanding Regional Playwright Award, the Richard Odlin Award, a Seattle Footlights Award, and has been a selected participant in numerous playwriting festivals across the country. He is a proud member of the Dramatists Guild. Feel free to check out his website at www.tomsmithplaywright.com.

About the Composer: Roger Butterley has worked with artists ranging from Michael McDonald and Phoebe Snow, to Gavin DeGraw and Jill Sobule, and has appeared on more than 20 albums. He has a longstanding relationship with Sh-K-Boom Records, having music directed many of the Sh-K-Boom Room concert series, as well as music directing and co-producing the CD of Paul Scott Goodman’s Bright Lights, Big City. As a composer, he has written three full length musicals: Fallen Angel and Eagle Song (both with Justin Murphy), and Turandot: The Rumble For The Ring with Randy Weiner and Diane Paulus. Roger has also composed music for commercials and industrials for clients including Avis, Symbol Technologies, and Chase Manhattan. He recently completed music for a new ride at Hershey Park, The Reese’s Extreme Cup Challenge.

A Christmas Carol was first produced by American Southwest Theatre Company (Las Cruces, NM) in 2000.


Confetti by Broken Gopher Ink

Comedy-Drama/ 7 characters, 5 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, 35 scenes

Synopsis: Gary lives with his middle-aged mother, Geg, and is “in a relationship” with Lindahl, but his real love is his drums. Maybe you’d prefer making loud sounds to growing-up, too, if your Mother was having sex with your cousin (her nephew, that’s right) and your girlfriend wants to bring her “emotional heart into harmonious balance.”

But in 35 punchy, sardonic scenes punctuated with original songs, this smart and unsentimental comedy manages to suggest that even someone as messed-up as Gary can manage to achieve, if not harmonious balance, a degree less mess-uppedness.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Broken Gopher Ink,
1521 9th Ave,
Greeley, Colorado,
USA, 80631.
Ph.: 970-356-4893
Email: brokengopher@hotmail.com
Playwrights Website: www.brokengopher.com

About the Playwright:Broken Gopher Ink are a pair of humble westerners whose delightfully crude and vicious plays have been produced all over the USA and small parts of Europe, but especially in New York City off-Broadway theatres, where Broken Gopher Ink acquired their bogus literary credibility. No one is sure who they are or what they want, but their deliciously low cholesterol mega-monologue play, My Heart and the Real World, has received eight separate off-Broadway productions (including two UK shows) thus cementing Broken Gopher Ink‘s reputation as cult failures.

Confetti was premiered at The American Theatre of Actors, in New York City, October, 1995.

Also by Broken Gopher Ink:
My Heart and the Real World

 

 

 

 

 

The Lost by Julia Britton

Drama/ 1 Characters, 1 Man/ One Act

Synopsis: Queer British writer, Christopher Isherwood relives and reviews his life at Cambridge University and in Nazi Germany, where he wrote the famousBerlin Stories (on which John Van Druten based his play I am a Camera and which was later adapted as the musical and film Cabaret). He is still suffering from the loss of his young German lover, Heinz, whom he failed to rescue from the Nazi authorities.

Playwright’s Notes

Read it Now
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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Julia Britton
3 Tiuna Grove
Elwood, Victoria
Australia 3184
Ph.: + 61 3 9531 9395
E-mail: juliabritton@hotmail.com

About the Playwright: Julia Britton graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at La Mama Theatre, St. Martin’s Theatre, Griffin Theatre, The Stage Company (Adelaide), The Blue Room (Perth), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), Theatreworks (Melbourne) with workshops at Playbox Theatre, Budgie Lung (Adelaide) and playreadings at The State Theatre of South Australia, (The Man Who Loved Furs with Geoffrey Rush) and Melbourne Arts Centre (Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End) in conjunction with The Golden Summers Exhibition (Westpac Gallery), Melbourne Theatre Company (Listening to Shells directed by Ron Rogers) and the South Australian Writer’s Theatre. Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia and also performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide. Recently, it was also performed at the Blue Room, Perth Festival and Theatreworks.She has written and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions including: Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea) Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), I’ve Danced with a Girl who Danced with the Prince of Wales (Rippon Lea), Good Morning Midnight! (La Mama), Sunset Children (La Mama), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), Seven Little Australians (Rippon Lea), The Singing Forest (Theatreworks), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne), The Yellow Book (Mietta’s), Perks (Mietta’s), The White Rose and the Blue (Melbourne Town Hall), The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building and The Hong Kong Fringe Festival).She was nominated for a Victorian Green Room Award in 1995 for In Transit. Other plays include: Hello, Last Page of My Life (reading at La Mama), Magdalena Amati (reading at La Mama), Somehow the Times Passes (reading La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), The Purple Kangaroo(reading La Mama), Snake!, A Cloudless Sky (reading at La Mama and Alice Springs), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), The Man Who Loved Furs (reading at La Mama), Internet Baby, (reading at La Mama), Mrs. Bloem (reading at Griffin Theatre), Two Sisters and Rose.

Her music theatre includes: Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron was produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand.

The Lost was first produced by Performing Arts Productions, Melbourne, and later appeared at the Hong Kong Fringe Festival. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; radio: Best Play Award, ABC Queensland; Nomination, Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.

 

 

Into The Clouds by Julia Britton

Drama/ 7 Characters, 5 Women, 2 Men/ One Act

Synopsis: Mrs. Bloem, a baby sitter with a Sydney family which is about to break up, becomes devoted to their twelve year old daughter, Emerald. Mrs. Bloem’s mother, Eva, was, during World War Two, a test pilot with Hitler’s Luftwaffe and came to Australia after the war ended. Emerald is mad about flying and sees Mrs. Bloem as the one stable factor of her life and someone to whom she can talk about her passion to fly. Behind them is the cult figure of Eva, now in her seventies and wandering in her mind, living again the heady and tragic last days of the Third Reich.

 

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Julia Britton
3 Tiuna Grove
Elwood, Victoria
Australia 3184
Ph.: + 61 3 9531 9395
E-mail: juliabritton@hotmail.com
 

About the Playwright: Julia Britton graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at La Mama Theatre, St. Martin’s Theatre, Griffin Theatre, The Stage Company (Adelaide), The Blue Room (Perth), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), Theatreworks (Melbourne) with workshops at Playbox Theatre, Budgie Lung (Adelaide) and playreadings at The State Theatre of South Australia, (The Man Who Loved Furs with Geoffrey Rush) and Melbourne Arts Centre (Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End) in conjunction with The Golden Summers Exhibition (Westpac Gallery), Melbourne Theatre Company (Listening to Shells directed by Ron Rogers) and the South Australian Writer’s Theatre. Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia and also performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide. Recently, it was also performed at the Blue Room, Perth Festival and Theatreworks. She has written and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions including: Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea) Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), I’ve Danced with a Girl who Danced with the Prince of Wales (Rippon Lea), Good Morning Midnight! (La Mama), Sunset Children (La Mama), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), Seven Little Australians (Rippon Lea), The Singing Forest (Theatreworks), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne),The Yellow Book (Mietta’s), Perks (Mietta’s), The White Rose and the Blue (Melbourne Town Hall), The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building and The Hong Kong Fringe Festival).She was nominated for a Victorian Green Room Award in 1995 for In Transit. Other plays include: Hello, Last Page of My Life (reading at La Mama), Magdalena Amati (reading at La Mama), Somehow the Times Passes (reading La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), The Purple Kangaroo(reading La Mama), Snake!, A Cloudless Sky (reading at La Mama and Alice Springs), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), The Man Who Loved Furs (reading at La Mama), Internet Baby, (reading at La Mama), Mrs. Bloem (reading at Griffin Theatre), Two Sisters and Rose.Her music theatre includes: Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron was produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; radio: Best Play Award, ABC Queensland; Nomination, Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.

Into the Clouds (under its original title Mrs. Bloem) was first read at Theatre 62, Adelaide on September 23, 1989. It was then workshopped by the Playbox Theatre Company, Melbourne directed by Malcolm Robertson, followed by a workshop week and a single performance in a week of new Australian plays at the Griffin Theatre Company at the Stables, Sydney.
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The Goose Girl by Gary L. Blackwood

Drama/ 6 Characters, 3 Men, 3 Women/ One Act

Synopsis: Queen Ysabel of Oldmark sends her daughter, Princess Jorinda, to marry King Ferdinand of Eastphalia, in order to seal an alliance between the two kingdoms. Elsa, an ambitious and devious maid in waiting, leads Jorinda to believe that her future husband is ill-tempered and ill-favored, and convinces the princess to trade roles: Elsa poses as the bride, and Jorinda is given a position as a lowly goose girl. Ferdinand, of course, proves to be neither ill-tempered nor ugly, but Jorinda can’t confess the truth, for fear of endangering the alliance.

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

The Goose Girl awaits its first production.

Fateville by Gary L. Blackwood

Drama/ 8 Characters, 6 Men, 2 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: After Arly Banks, sick of living in poverty, runs off with a traveling book seller, his parents are determined not to let the same thing happen again. In an attempt to make life better for their daughter, Bonnie, they take to murdering travelers for their money and keep the girl a virtual prisoner in the house.

But then a handsome young stranger from St. Louis, stranded there in a storm, threatens to steal her away. The parents do him in, only to discover that he was their long-lost son. The story is based on an Ozark folk tale.

 

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

Fateville awaits its first production.

Dark Horse by Gary L Blackwood

Drama/ 13 Characters, 11 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Missouri, 1837. The circuit judge of Crawford County has summoned a grand jury to hear the case of Mary, a slave accused of beating and drowning her master’s two-year-old child. Phillip Cole, a transplanted Bostonian with a cold and calculating manner, has volunteered to defend the girl, over the objections of his bigoted partner, who is sure they don’t have a chance of winning. In Missouri, a slave is not even permitted to testify against a white man.

Cole is more optimistic. A trial, he says, is like a chess game; sometimes all you have to do is wait for your opponent to make a wrong move. His confidence is shaken when Mary refuses even to tell her side of the story. To add to his troubles, the foolish and incompetent circuit attorney is assigned to work with him. Stereger, the prosecuting attorney, seems willing to stoop to anything that will further his case, and Judge Evans is more concerned with having a speedy trial than a fair one.

With no witnesses for the defense, Cole relies on clever cross examining– what he calls “fishing.” He uncovers some damaging facts. First he learns that two days passed between the time the child died and the time the sheriff was summoned. Second, he finds that the child’s father was known to have beaten both Mary and the child.

Gradually the defense’s case grows stronger. Even Mary begins to display a little hope, and reveals the truth to Cole: She lost her temper and beat the child, then locked the little girl in the springhouse, where she drowned.

Afraid of losing, Stereger calls a new witness who testifies– falsely– that shortly before the murder he saw Mary beat the child and threaten to drown her. Frustrated, Cole asks the judge to let Mary speak on her own behalf. The request is denied. After only a few minutes’ deliberation, the jury finds Mary guilty. The judge sentences her to hang. Mary can forgive them, because she never expected any more from them. It’s Cole she can’t forgive. He gave her hope, and then it was snatched away again.

Cole promises to get her an appeal and a new trial, but she knows it’s no use. She holds no hope for an afterlife, either. “If they is one,” she says, “I ‘spect it’s just for white folks, too.”

An excerpt from Dark Horse may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information.

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

Dark Horse was first produced by Ferndale Repertory Theatre, Ferndale, California in March, 1993.

The Count of One by Gary L. Blackwood

Drama/ 3 characters, 1 Man, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: (from The Carmel Pine Cone): “The Count of One concerns Dian, a burned-out hypnotherapist, who evokes John Wilkes Booth from her new patient, Stuart, while he is ‘under.’ At first, she thinks the tranced-out Stuart is simply identifying with the famous assassin, but deeper into the sessions, she begins to realize she is conversing with Booth himself and she becomes privy to some startling information.” Based on a true incident.

The first act of The Count of One may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information.

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary L. Blackwood
Box 215
Tatamagouche, NS
B0K 1V0
Email: garylblackwood@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Gary L. Blackwood’s first published novel, Wild Timothy (Atheneum), was a Weekly Reader Book Club selection and was translated into several languages. The Dying Sun (Atheneum) was voted Best YA Novel of 1989 by Friends of American Writers. Moonshine (Cavendish) was named a Notable Children’s Book of 1999 by Smithsonian Magazine. The Shakespeare Stealer (Dutton) was a Junior Library Guild Selection, a Scholastic Book Club selection, and one of School Library Journal’s Best Books. The American Library Association placed it on its lists of Notable Children’s Books and Best Books for Young Adults. The sequel, Shakespeare’s Scribe, is a Smithsonian Notable Book and an ALA Best Books for Young Adults.Mr. Blackwood’s stage plays have been produced in regional and university theatres. As winner of the 1993 Missouri Scriptworks, Dark Horse, a historical courtroom drama, was given a staged reading in St. Louis; the following year it won a playwriting competition at the Ferndale Repertory Theatre, where it was given a full production. His stage adaptation of Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome is published by Baker’s Plays, and an adaptation of The Shakespeare Stealerpremiered at The Kennedy Center in March, 2002.

The Count of One was first produced by Festival of Firsts at the Carl Cherry Center for the Arts, Carmel, California in October, 2001.

 

 

The Science of Disconnection by David Belke

Cathy Derkach in The Science of Disconnection, Shadow Theatre, Edmonton

Drama/ 1 character, 1 Woman/ One Act

Synopsis: A play for solo performance based on the life of physicist Lise Meitner, a shy and withdrawn woman from Vienna, with a genius for mathematics and a passion for science, whose discoveries literally changed the world.

1938. The Nazis have invaded Austria, and Lise is forced to flee for her life. While living in exile, she secretly continues to collaborate with her research partner, Otto Hahn. Together, they discover nuclear fission, and ultimately, the science to create the atomic bomb. But you’ve probably never heard of her. There’s a reason for that.

The play follows Lise in the last few moments of her life as she relives the past and struggles to come to terms with the hearbreaking betrayal of Otto, her colleague and collaborator of over 40 years.

The Science of Disconnection is a story of quiet triumph and achievement in the face of discrimination, danger, and crushing betrayal.

“Belke skilfully builds his story, maintaining his theme of connection and disconnection, both personally and scientifically.”
– Edmonton Sun

“[Belke’s] careful to present Meitner as a flesh and blood figure, and does a lovely job of showcasing, in particular, the little human ticks she frequently lets slip — her geeked-up over-excitement of watching an Einstein lecture, the stone-faced, sombre panic of giving her first lecture of her own. As a whole it compiles a very lifelike image of a woman whose incredible contributions to physics were stolen by or credited to her male counterparts, but who pushed on undaunted.”
– Vue Weekly

“A remarkable piece of theatre showcasing human interaction’s capacity for great creation and destruction, as well as the interplay between a single human narrative and the mysteries of the universe.”
– Paririe Groundling

Winner of the Elizabeth Sterling Haynes Award for Outstanding New Play

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
David Belke
10037 84 Avenue
Edmonton Alberta
T6E 2G6
phone (780) 437-7507
Contact form: http://www.davidbelke.ca/index.php/contact-david


About the Playwright: David Belke was born in Winnipeg, Canada but was raised and continues to flourish in Edmonton, Alberta. He graduated from the University of Alberta with a B.Ed. and where he also studied stage design. He fills many different roles in the theatre: performer, producer, designer, teacher, and award-winning playwright. His plays have been performed across Canada as well as in the United States, England and Northern Ireland. His first full length play was produced for the 1990 Edmonton Fringe Theatre Festival, the largest theatre festival in North America. Since then, he has written a new play for each subsequent year becoming one of the Fringe’s mainstays and one of the city’s favorite playwrights. David currently works as resident playwright and designer with Edmonton’s Shadow Theatre where he is also an artistic associate. Shadow Theatre usually produces one of David’s plays a year, either a premiere or a remount. A multiple Sterling Award winner, David also received prestigious Samuel French Inc.’s Canadian Playwrights Award for 2000 and they have since published two of his plays. In addition, he is a cast member of Edmonton’s long-running comedy institution Die-Nasty, the live improvised soap opera. He also serves as a member of the Varscona Theatre Alliance Board and The Elizabeth Sterling Haynes Awards Committee.

The Science Of Disconnection was originally produced by Shadow Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta in March, 2010

In Rebel Country by Kevin Barry

Drama/ 3 characters, 2 Men, 1 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis (from The Cincinnati Enquirer): “The lessons of youth, discovered and undiscovered, are what confront two small-town friends as they make a trek from Elm Creek, Neb., to Fairmount, Ind., to visit the grave of their screen idol, James Dean.

“Johnnie is an obsessive movie buff who can name the year and director of seemingly every film ever made. Jamie has narrowed his obsession strictly to James Dean. He knows every fact from Mr. Dean’s few years (or does he?) and would rather live Mr. Dean’s life than his own.

“Along the way, they pick up Lizzie, a savvy hitchhiker from Los Angeles who alters their journey and adds an element of potential violence to the trip.”

“Mr. Barry sends his characters through the rebel country of the American Midwest, a sort of empty heartland without a heart. He adeptly blends flashes of humor and poetry to the gritty language and stark reality of this engaging highway to the unknown. . . . edgy and engrossing.”
– The Cincinnati Enquirer

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Kevin Barry
Ph.: 513-831-4421
E-mail: barrywerks@cinci.rr.com

About the Playwright: Kevin Barry is a native New Yorker and a member of the Dramatists Guild, as well as a founding member of Cincinnati Playwrights Initiative. His plays include: I Will Love You at 8PM Next Wednesday (Los Angeles, Cincinnati),Remember I’ll Always Be True (Los Angeles, Cincinnati), The Secret of Durable Pigments (Denver), American Standard (Chicago, Denver, Cincinnati), Remembering Juliet (Cincinnati), Him (New York, Cincinnati), The Portable Max (Cincinnati), Distracted by the Landscape (Los Angeles), In Rebel Country (Cincinnati), and Track and Field (Cincinnati), which was also nominated for the American Theatre Critics Association Award.

In Rebel Country was first produced by the Know Theatre Tribe, Cincinnati, Ohio in May, 2000
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