A Christmas Carol by Tom Smith

A Christmas Carol

Drama with Music/ 5+ males, 5+ females (10-35+ performers possible)/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: An enchanting adaptation of Dickens’ classic tale of Ebenezer Scrooge and his redemption from a life of greed and sadness. When four ghosts visit Scrooge, he is forced to look at his life-past, present and future-and witness the effect he has on others. A “play with music,” the script includes four songs.

Most of A Christmas Carol may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information on this page.

Published by arrangement with YouthPLAYS

 

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
YouthPLAYS
7119 W Sunset Blvd #390
Los Angeles, CA
USA 90046
E-mail: info@youthplays.com
Website: www.youthplays.com

About the Playwright: Tom Smith’s published plays include The Wild and Wacky Rhyming Stories of Miss Henrietta Humpledowning, ESL, What Comes Around, A Christmas Carol and Johnny and Sally Ann… (YouthPLAYS);Marguerita’s Secret Diary (Baker’s Plays); Gray (Original Works Online); andThe Pathmaker, Comedy of Errors (editor), Much Ado About Nothing (editor),Two Gentlemen of Verona (editor), and Love’s Labour’s Lost (editor) for Encore Performance Publishing as well as Dangerous, The Odyssey and Drinking Habits, published by Playscripts. His other plays have received productions both nationally and internationally. Tom is the recipient of the Robert J. Pickering Award for Excellence in Playwriting, the ATHE Playworks Award, the Orlin R. Corey Outstanding Regional Playwright Award, the Richard Odlin Award, a Seattle Footlights Award, and has been a selected participant in numerous playwriting festivals across the country. He is a proud member of the Dramatists Guild. Feel free to check out his website at www.tomsmithplaywright.com.

About the Composer: Roger Butterley has worked with artists ranging from Michael McDonald and Phoebe Snow, to Gavin DeGraw and Jill Sobule, and has appeared on more than 20 albums. He has a longstanding relationship with Sh-K-Boom Records, having music directed many of the Sh-K-Boom Room concert series, as well as music directing and co-producing the CD of Paul Scott Goodman’s Bright Lights, Big City. As a composer, he has written three full length musicals: Fallen Angel and Eagle Song (both with Justin Murphy), and Turandot: The Rumble For The Ring with Randy Weiner and Diane Paulus. Roger has also composed music for commercials and industrials for clients including Avis, Symbol Technologies, and Chase Manhattan. He recently completed music for a new ride at Hershey Park, The Reese’s Extreme Cup Challenge.

A Christmas Carol was first produced by American Southwest Theatre Company (Las Cruces, NM) in 2000.


A Singular Man by Julia Britton

Drama/ 1 Character, 1 Man/ One act

Synopsis: Gay English writer Christopher Isherwood relives and reviews his life at Cambridge University and in Nazi Germany, where he wrote the famous Berlin Stories (on which John Van Druten based his play I am a Camera and from which came the musical and film Cabaret). He is still suffering from the loss of his young German lover, Heinz, whom he failed to rescue from the Nazi authorities.

 

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
E-mail: info@singlelane.com

About the Playwright: Julia Britton graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at La Mama Theatre, St. Martin’s Theatre, Griffin Theatre, The Stage Company (Adelaide), The Blue Room (Perth), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), Theatreworks (Melbourne) with workshops at Playbox Theatre, Budgie Lung (Adelaide) and playreadings at The State Theatre of South Australia, (The Man Who Loved Furs with Geoffrey Rush) and Melbourne Arts Centre (Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End) in conjunction with The Golden Summers Exhibition (Westpac Gallery), Melbourne Theatre Company (Listening to Shells directed by Ron Rogers) and the South Australian Writer’s Theatre.

Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia and also performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide. Recently, it was also performed at the Blue Room, Perth Festival and Theatreworks. She has written and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions including: Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea) Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), I’ve Danced with a Girl who Danced with the Prince of Wales (Rippon Lea), Good Morning Midnight! (La Mama), Sunset Children (La Mama), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), Seven Little Australians (Rippon Lea), The Singing Forest (Theatreworks), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne),The Yellow Book (Mietta’s), Perks (Mietta’s), The White Rose and the Blue (Melbourne Town Hall), The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building and The Hong Kong Fringe Festival).She was nominated for a Victorian Green Room Award in 1995 for In Transit.

Other plays include: Hello, Last Page of My Life (reading at La Mama), Magdalena Amati (reading at La Mama), Somehow the Times Passes (reading La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), The Purple Kangaroo(reading La Mama), Snake!, A Cloudless Sky (reading at La Mama and Alice Springs), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), The Man Who Loved Furs (reading at La Mama), Internet Baby, (reading at La Mama), Mrs. Bloem (reading at Griffin Theatre), Two Sisters and Rose.Her music theatre includes: Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron was produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; radio: Best Play Award, ABC Queensland; Nomination, Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.

A Singular Man was first performed at the Melbourne Fringe Festival in Melbourne, Australia on September 25th, 1996.

A Stranger on the Bus by Ed Shockley

Drama/ Flexible cast of 12-50, 7-25 males, 5-25 females/ Full Length, about 120 minutes

Synopsis:
A young African-American girl takes an epic fantasy journey set against the backdrop of the busing movement, as two families, one on each side of the racial divide, grow to discover their love for each other.

The audience experiences the landmark Swann v. Board of Education case that completed the integration of American schools through her dream. With Jim Crow appearing in the guise of a giant trickster bird to battle the forces of progress, this award-winning epic begins at World War II and journeys to the moment when two innocent children can sit side by side en route to a new era in our nation’s history.

A portion of A Stranger on the Bus may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information on this page.

Published by arrangement with YouthPLAYS

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:Amateur and professional rights:
YouthPLAYS
7119 W Sunset Blvd #390
Los Angeles, CA
USA 90046
E-mail: info@youthplays.com
Website: www.youthplays.com

About the Playwright: Ed Shockley, MFA is author of more than 80 plays. His works have set five box office records and been honored with numerous awards, including the Stephen Sondheim Award for Outstanding Contributions to American Musical Theatre, a Pew Fellowship in the Arts and PA State Arts Council Playwrights Fellowship. He has received commissions for youth theatre plays from Seattle Children’s Theatre, Children’s Theatre of Charlotte, Dallas Children’s Theatre, Black Spectrum Theatre and the Harlem Renaissance Theatre. His historical short film, Stone Mansion, aired on Showtime television.

A Stranger on the Bus was commissioned and produced by Charlotte Children’s Theatre (Charlotte, NC), 1997.

A Wolf By The Ears by Mattie Lennon

Drama/ 6 Characters, 5 Men, 1 Woman/ One Act (20 minutes)

Synopsis: Hughie Doherty is a young Irish farmer who makes up doggerel as a pastime. Those who don’t know any better call him a poet. He gets into conflict with the forces of law and order when he is arrested for a crime that hasn’t been committed. Because the cell in which he is detained is inadequately sound-proofed, he learns that, in fact, he has the upper hand. He uses this situation to the best advantage before the final curtain.

 

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Mattie Lennon
E-mail: mattielennon@gmail.com
Playwright’s website: mattielennon.com

About the Playwright: Mattie Lennon writes the occasional humorous article and has contributed to The Irish Times, Sunday Independent,The Irish Post, Ireland’s Own, Ireland’s Eye, The Wicklow People, Kerry’s Eye, Leinster Leader and many more. He also writes for a number of on-line magazines, including irishpoetsworldwide.com. He has compiled and presented programmes on RTE Radio One and currently presents a ballad programme on Radio Dublin 100FM.

He has spent most of the past 30 years in Dublin; but whenever asked “Will you ever go back to Kylebeg?” he quotes James Joyce’s reply when asked the same question about Dublin: “I never left.” He is married, with a family, although currently his wife is wondering what sort of an eejit he is to be sitting at a computer, at this time of night, typing this with one finger.

A Wolf by the Ears awaits its first production.

Albert Finney Doesn’t Live Here Anymore by John Chambers

Comedy-Drama/ 3 characters, 2 Men, 1 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Steve is a disillusioned working class man. Liberated by the heady mix of music and radical politics in the ’60s and ’70s, the ’80s saw all his hopes of something better come to nothing. His teenage son “Lud” never held out any hope. He’s a Generation X-er — which adds to Steve’s frustrations. Steve’s wife Cath is caught between the warring factions. Her journey — and her direct action — becomes collective action. Can any of them see light at the end of the tunnel . . .

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
John Chambers
Email: artistan38@tiscali.co.uk

About the Playwright: John has had some 40 plays premiered in his native North West of England — ranging from a Number One tour to fringe. He has written for most Reps in the region and was Arts Council Resident Dramatist at Manchester LTC and Resident Writer at M6 Theatre. His plays have subsequently been performed around the UK and as far afield as Australia and the US. He’s also written over a hundred hours of TV drama, as well as plays for radio.

Albert Finney Doesn’t Live Here Anymore was first performed at Manchester LTC, 1997.

All Clear by Eugene Stickland

Drama/ 5 characters, 3 Men, 2 Women / Full length, 90 mins.

Synopsis (from Fast Forward Weekly): “Delaney and his family are trapped in their suburban home in the orange-alert aftermath of some devastating attack — perhaps nuclear, perhaps germ warfare — waiting for the ‘all clear’ that will let them re-emerge. The doors and windows are sealed with plastic sheeting and duct tape, the power has been cut, they have no way of communicating with the outside world, and all they can see of it through the living-room window is a shroud of orange fog.

“While Delaney sits sullenly at a table, trying to write poetry but mainly polishing off the last of the Scotch, the other family members wander in and out of the room aimlessly, seemingly wanting to connect with one another but unable to.”Maddie, Delaney’s bitter wife, wants a divorce. Billie, their spoiled-brat adult daughter, wants her cell phone, CNN, and her boyfriend. Bobby, their teenage son, has been damaged mentally by exposure to the fog, his brain stuck absurdly on the last things he saw while standing in a 7-Eleven ogling a copy of Maxim when the attack hit. ‘Big Gulp,’ he says, over and over. And ‘orange.’ Complicating matters . . . is the presence of German architect Braun, whose affair with Maddie many years ago drove the wedge between her and Delaney . . . .”At its best, the play functions as a dark satire of the North American nuclear family at its lowest ebb, a sort of Endgame in suburbia. Everyone is self-absorbed and no one knows how to reach out — in one sadly telling scene, Billie tells her father she is scared. ‘Yeah. Me too,’ says Delaney and then, instead of hugging his frightened daughter, he merely pats her shoulder and walks away. And no one has a clue how to survive in these dire conditions — the kind in which the other half of the world too often finds itself. ‘I think we were in the Age of Certainty,’ says Delaney, and the phrase, stuffed with smug Western complacency, has a terrible ring to it.”

“Offers a stark and unforgettably moving requiem for the end of the world as we know it . . . . Simply one of the most honest, courageous, tightly written, best acted, and emotionally gripping plays to have graced Alberta Theatre Projects’ playRites Festival in recent years.”
– The Calgary Herald

“Perhaps [Stickland’s] darkest play yet. . . . . On the one hand, the play continues the theme that has run through most of Stickland’s playRites plays — contemporary people (usually adult families), in a world of eroding values and traditions, trying to deal with change. On the other hand, the playwright has refused to sugar the bitterness with comedy — unless it’s the bleak kind found in the likes of Samuel Beckett.”
– Fast Forward Weekly

“Bleakly funny.”
– Vue Weekly

 

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
Eugene Stickland
1517 21st Avenue S.W.
Calgary, AB
Canada
T2T 0M8.
Ph.: (403) 244-8941
Email: eugenius@telusplanet.net


About the Playwright: Eugene Stickland began writing plays following the completion of his M.F.A. at York University in 1984. Ten years later, at Alberta Theatre Projects playRites ’94, his play Some Assembly Required received its premiere production. Since then, the play has had 15 productions around Canada and the US. It was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award for Drama in 1995. During his tenure as Playwright-in-Residence at ATP, Eugene went on to write Sitting on Paradise (1996), A Guide to Mourning (1998), Appetite (2000) and Midlife (2002).

All Clear was first produced by Alberta Theatre Projects, Calgary, in January 2004.

If you prefer, click here to buy a printed copy.
 

All Clear by Eugene Stickland

Drama/ 5 characters, 3 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, 90 mins.

Synopsis (from Fast Forward Weekly): “Delaney and his family are trapped in their suburban home in the orange-alert aftermath of some devastating attack — perhaps nuclear, perhaps germ warfare — waiting for the ‘all clear’ that will let them re-emerge. The doors and windows are sealed with plastic sheeting and duct tape, the power has been cut, they have no way of communicating with the outside world, and all they can see of it through the living-room window is a shroud of orange fog.

“While Delaney sits sullenly at a table, trying to write poetry but mainly polishing off the last of the Scotch, the other family members wander in and out of the room aimlessly, seemingly wanting to connect with one another but unable to.

“Maddie, Delaney’s bitter wife, wants a divorce. Billie, their spoiled-brat adult daughter, wants her cell phone, CNN, and her boyfriend. Bobby, their teenage son, has been damaged mentally by exposure to the fog, his brain stuck absurdly on the last things he saw while standing in a 7-Eleven ogling a copy of Maxim when the attack hit. ‘Big Gulp,’ he says, over and over. And ‘orange.’ Complicating matters . . . is the presence of German architect Braun, whose affair with Maddie many years ago drove the wedge between her and Delaney . . . .”

At its best, the play functions as a dark satire of the North American nuclear family at its lowest ebb, a sort ofEndgame in suburbia. Everyone is self-absorbed and no one knows how to reach out — in one sadly telling scene, Billie tells her father she is scared. ‘Yeah. Me too,’ says Delaney and then, instead of hugging his frightened daughter, he merely pats her shoulder and walks away. And no one has a clue how to survive in these dire conditions — the kind in which the other half of the world too often finds itself. ‘I think we were in the Age of Certainty,’ says Delaney, and the phrase, stuffed with smug Western complacency, has a terrible ring to it.”

“Offers a stark and unforgettably moving requiem for the end of the world as we know it . . . . Simply one of the most honest, courageous, tightly written, best acted, and emotionally gripping plays to have graced Alberta Theatre Projects’ playRites Festival in recent years.”
– The Calgary Herald

“Perhaps [Stickland’s] darkest play yet. . . . . On the one hand, the play continues the theme that has run through most of Stickland’s playRites plays — contemporary people (usually adult families), in a world of eroding values and traditions, trying to deal with change. On the other hand, the playwright has refused to sugar the bitterness with comedy — unless it’s the bleak kind found in the likes of Samuel Beckett.”
– Fast Forward Weekly

“Bleakly funny.”
– Vue Weekly

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Eugene Stickland
1517 21st Avenue S.W.
Calgary, AB
Canada
T2T 0M8.
Ph.: (403) 244-8941
Email: eugenius@telusplanet.net

About the Playwright: Eugene Stickland began writing plays following the completion of his M.F.A. at York University in 1984. Ten years later, at Alberta Theatre Projects playRites ’94, his play Some Assembly Required received its premiere production. Since then, the play has had 15 productions around Canada and the US. It was a finalist for the Governor General’s Award for Drama in 1995. During his tenure as Playwright-in-Residence at ATP, Eugene went on to write Sitting on Paradise (1996), A Guide to Mourning (1998), Appetite (2000) and Midlife (2002).All Clear was first produced by Alberta Theatre Projects, Calgary, in January 2004.
If you prefer, click here to buy a printed copy.

All I Ever Wanted by Frank Moher

Drama/ 4 characters, 2 Men, 2 Women / Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: (from the Times-Colonist [Victoria]): “The tale of a small Vancouver Island community disrupted when someone’s secrets are revealed by a newspaper reporter.

“Harmon is a good-hearted, middle-aged farmer . . . . Todd, a bald-pated alternative-rock aficionado, is Harmon’s hired hand. Life in their anonymous yet idyllic island community is disrupted with the arrival of Kim, a Calgary newspaper reporter who starts her own paper. Kim’s big city tactics (print and be damned) shake up this close-knit hamlet.”

From The Bulletin (Nanaimo): “Apparently Harmon has been taking in young offenders to work on his farm and purposely not telling people about the boys’ criminal pasts.

“It’s a story that forces its characters, as well as the audience, to examine their capacity for tolerance as they come to grips with Harmon and his latest farm hand Todd Horstmann, whom everyone likes until they find out that he was previously arrested.”

“Timely and powerful . . . . a strong play, and one worth seeing.”
– The Bulletin (Nanaimo)

“A thought-provoking and emotional play about betrayal and conflict . . . excellent.”
– Island Life Magazine

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Single Lane Entertainment,
650 Little Blvd.,
Gabriola Island, B.C.,
Canada,
V0R 1X3.
Ph.: (in North America) 1-800-811-7405; or 250-247-9216
Email: info@singlelane.com
Playwright’s website: FrankMoher.com

About the Playwright: Frank Moher’s plays have been produced internationally, at theatres including South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, Calif.), Detroit Repertory Theatre, Round House Theatre (Silver Spring, Maryland), the Canadian Stage Company (Toronto), the Wellington Repertory Theatre (Wellington, New Zealand), Workshop West Theatre (Edmonton, Alta.), the Asolo Theater (Sarasota, Fla.), Alberta Theatre Projects (Calgary), Dodona Theatre (Prishtina, Kosova), The Mingei Theatre (Tokyo), and OmaDa Theatre (Athens, Greece). He has won a Los Angeles Drama-Logue Award for Writing (for Odd Jobs), the Edmonton Sterling Award for Outstanding New Play (for both The Third Ascent and Prairie Report,), and is published by both ProPlay and the Playwrights Guild of Canada. Frank has taught at the University of British Columbia and the University of Alberta (where he was a Distinguished Visiting Artist), and is currently an instructor in scriptwriting and journalism at Vancouver Island University. He has also worked professionally as a literary manager and dramaturg, and written for publications including The Globe and Mail, The National Post, Saturday Night magazine, The Georgia Straight, backofthebook.ca and salon.com.

All I Ever Wanted was premiered by the Nanaimo Festival Theatre, Nanaimo, B.C., in November, 1995

Also by Frank Moher on ProPlay:

And All His Songs Were Sad by Mattie Lennon, Music & Lyrics by Sean McCarthy

Simon Balcan and Kerry Steed in Lizzy, Darcy and Jane

Drama with Music/ 4 Characters, 3 Men, 1 Woman/ Full Length (App. 80 minutes)

Synopsis: A play with music about the Irish songwriter Sean McCarthy and his complex relationship with the singer Peggy Sweeney. Her gorgeous, definitive recordings of McCarthy’s folk tunes about death and unrequited love were responsible for cementing his fame throughout Ireland.

From Fort Worth Weekly: “Their collaboration was so intense, many people wanted to know: Was there any funny business going on? . . . The more intriguing thing about their ‘artistic friendship’ was that she seemed to be the artist, while he was her muse. That’s an interesting reversal of the typical singer-songwriter arrangement.

“Amateur McCarthy scholar Lennon never met McCarthy; his script is based on interviews and newspaper accounts of his life and of his musical partnership with Sweeney. The title of the show comes from a quote by the English writer G.K. Chesterton, whose ode to the Irish famously declared that ‘All their wars are merry/ And all their songs are sad.'”

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Mattie Lennon
E-mail: mattielennon@gmail.com
Playwright’s website: mattielennon.com

About the Playwright: Mattie Lennon writes the occasional humorous article and has contributed to The Irish Times, Sunday Independent,The Irish Post, Ireland’s Own, Ireland’s Eye, The Wicklow People, Kerry’s Eye, Leinster Leader and many more. He also writes for a number of on-line magazines, including irishpoetsworldwide.com. He has compiled and presented programmes on RTE Radio One and currently presents a ballad programme on Radio Dublin 100FM.

He has spent most of the past 30 years in Dublin; but whenever asked “Will you ever go back to Kylebeg?” he quotes James Joyce’s reply when asked the same question about Dublin: “I never left.” He is married, with a family, although currently his wife is wondering what sort of an eejit he is to be sitting at a computer, at this time of night, typing this with one finger.

And All His Songs Were Sad was first produced by The Pantaglieze Theatre in Fort Worth, Texas in September, 2010.

 

And The Stones Will Cry Out by David M. Graham

And
Comedy-Drama/ 3 Characters, 3 Men/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: When the arrogant Dr. Johann Beringer, Dean of the Medical School in Wurzburg, Germany in 1725, discovers some unusual fossils, he becomes convinced that the stones are a gift from God that will make him famous. What he does not know is that they are forgeries, craftily carved by a rival professor at the University, algebra teacher Ignatius Roderick.

With the unwilling help of the school’s librarian, Georg Von Eckhart, Roderick carves and distributes over 2000 stones, hoping to embarrass the ambitious Beringer. The scheme works, as Beringer writes and self-publishes an expensive book that brings him temporary notoriety. Sensing that the hoax has gone too far, the conspirators confess to Beringer that he has been duped, but the arrogant Doctor refuses to believe it. Events spiral out of control when Beringer is finally convinced, and the whole house of cards comes tumbling down, leading to a trial and its inevitable consequences.

Based on real events, And The Stones Will Cry Out is a tale of the uneasy war between faith and science, the difficulty of friendship, and of course, rocks.

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
David M. Graham
340 W. Regent St. Apt. 6
Inglewood, CA 90301-1160
Ph.: 323-395-9985
E-mail: onlylivingheartdonor@gmail.com

About the Playwright: David is a Georgia native who came to Los Angeles to pursue his dream of being poor and hungry. In the actor’s tradition, he has drifted from here to there and had many jobs — including BMW salesman and gravedigger. He is a seasoned actor and director, with many shows to his credit.

And The Stones Will Cry Out is David’s first full length play, though a short of his, The Death of a Sale, Man, was performed in Los Angeles, and three of his short works, The Right Impression, Eden 2025, and Stealing Home have been included in every year of the Arabian Shakespeare Festival. He has also (self) published the first novel in his series A Little Mythunderstanding..

A 50-minute version of And The Stones Will Cry Out was presented by the Gorilla Theatre Company for the Festival of Independent Theatres in Dallas, Texas in July, 2015. It was first produced in its current full-length form at Little Fish Theatre in San Pedro, California in August, 2015.

“Graham’s thought-provoking work builds upon a prank, which is revealed early on in the play, but the play doesn’t feel farcical. It feels like any good drama in which the conflict causes people to come to the crux of what ails them.” – Daily Breeze, Los Angeles