McLuhan: The Musical — Book by Frank Moher, Music & Lyrics by Gerald Reid

McLuhan: The Musical

Musical Comedy-Drama/ Multiple Characters, 5 actors minimum (gender-blind casting encouraged)/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis (from the Globe and Mail [Toronto]): “McLuhan: The Musical is nothing less than an attempt to dramatize the ideas of the late media theorist who was briefly the toast of the Western world (remember his cameo appearance in the film Annie Hall?) before his notions fell into obscurity in the Eighties.

“Moher, like media heavyweights such as Lewis Lapham, believes McLuhan’s time has come again simply because the world he predicted has come to pass . . . . Rummaging in his playwright’s toolbox, Moher decides to recount this hyperspace narrative as a medieval morality play. Herbert Marshall McLuhan is born, about the same time as radio, on a farm near Edmonton. He endures the torment of being a colonial hayseed at Oxford, and makes his way to a teaching post in America, where he becomes fascinated by advertising’s grip on the human mind. He returns to Canada just in time for the invention of TV.

“Bright, childlike theatrical trickery attends the tale. Teenage Marshall twists a radio dial. Suddenly the stage blacks-out and two puppets — little Marshall and a sort of radio spirit — are hovering in an electronic void . . . . Here he learns about Electronic Space, with its wonderful promise of being everywhere and nowhere at the same time.

“McLuhan panics as his ideas take on a life of their own, and his warning about the future — because, in truth, he hates and fears the new electronic world — is twisted into a celebration . . . . The play ends with McLuhan longing for the dense, sun-baked real-ness of his childhood prairie soil.”

“All the senses were gleefully aggressed and we were in for a night of razzle-dazzle . . . A very entertaining, lively, and intelligent show.”
– CBC Radio (Ottawa)

“A revelatory experience . . . . A good review of McLuhan: The Musical is almost redundant: the word of mouth is doing it all.”
– The Ottawa Express

McLuhan succeeds because it never loses its sense of fun . . . . [it] conveys the life story of Marshall McLuhan, but more important, it compares the utopian aspirations of a generation which saw the introduction of the electronic mass media to the complex reality of a wired society.”
– The University of Ottawa Charlatan

“Combines fantasy, humour, and great musical numbers for an evening of enjoyable intellectual stimulation . . . . Whether you’re a communication theory buff, or a musical theatre patron, McLuhan: The Musical is sure to please.”
– The Fulcrum (Ottawa)

“McLuhan would probably be amused. And, in one or two transcendent moments, perhaps even a little honored.”
– The Ottawa Citizen

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Single Lane Entertainment,
650 Little Blvd.,
Gabriola Island, B.C.,
Canada,
V0R 1X3.
Ph.: (in North America) 1-855-757-9216 or 250-247-9216
Email: info@singlelane.com
Playwright’s website: FrankMoher.com

About the Playwright: Frank Moher’s plays have been produced internationally, at theatres including South Coast Repertory (Costa Mesa, Calif.), Detroit Repertory Theatre, Round House Theatre (Silver Spring, Maryland), the Canadian Stage Company (Toronto), the Wellington Repertory Theatre (Wellington, New Zealand), Workshop West Theatre (Edmonton, Alta.), the Asolo Theater (Sarasota, Fla.), Alberta Theatre Projects (Calgary), Dodona Theatre (Prishtina, Kosova), The Mingei Theatre (Tokyo), and OmaDa Theatre (Athens, Greece). He has won a Los Angeles Drama-Logue Award for Writing (for Odd Jobs), the Edmonton Sterling Award for Outstanding New Play (for both The Third Ascent and Prairie Report,), and is published by both ProPlay and the Playwrights Guild of Canada. Frank has taught at the University of British Columbia and the University of Alberta (where he was a Distinguished Visiting Artist), and is currently an instructor in scriptwriting and journalism at Vancouver Island University. He has also worked professionally as a literary manager and dramaturg, and written for publications including The Globe and Mail, The National Post, Saturday Night magazine, The Georgia Straight, backofthebook.ca and salon.com.

McLuhan: The Musical was premiered by The Great Canadian Theatre Company, Ottawa, in October, 1994.

Also by Frank Moher on ProPlay:

 

Metastasis: Chain of Ruin by Gordon Pengilly

Tragi-comedy/ 8 Characters, 5 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Named for the pathological spread of live rot through a system, Metastasis sets 25 characters in motion, rippling out from a random drive by shooting, to conjure a world of missed connections and crossed wires.

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Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Gordon Pengilly
401-27th Ave. NW
Calgary, AB, Canada
T2M 2H7
Tel: (403) 277-6572
E-mail: gpengilly@nucleus.com

About the Playwright: Gordon Pengilly has written more than 50 plays for TV, film, radio and the stage. His work, including Seeds, Swipe, Metastasis, Yours ’til The Moon Falls Down, Tom Three Persons, Tom Form And The Speed Of Love, Contraption and They Don’t Call Them Farmers Anymore, has been produced across Canada and abroad. His one-act playThe Work Play, which premiered in New York at the Actor’s Loft in 2000 before being produced in Japan in 2002, was made into a short film seen at Fourth Wall Screenings in 2005.Gordon is also one of the most prolific radio dramatists in Canada. In 1989, CBC selectedThe Ballad Of An Existential Cowboy as one its Best-of-Decade. In The Middle Of Town Stands The Dreamland was nominated for a Peabody Award in 1993 and rebroadcast in Australia, and Seeing In the Dark received the 2007 BBC International Radio Drama Prize and was broadcast on the World Service.

Gordon has been resident playwright for theatres and institutions in Edmonton, Calgary, Banff, Red Deer, Toronto and Fredericton and routinely runs workshops for Alberta Playwrights Network. His first collection of plays, Metastasis And Other Plays, published by NeWest Press received the 2009 W.O. Mitchell Book Prize.

Metastasis: Chain of Ruin was first produced by Northern Light Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta in 1995.

If you prefer, click below to buy a printed copy in the collection Metastasis and Other Plays:
 

Milk and Cookies by Jonathan Dorf

Patrick Gallagher and Beth Patrik in Milk and Cookies at the Sidewalk Studio Theatre, Burbank, California, 2008

Dark comedy/ 6 Characters, 2 Men (with doubling), 2 Women/ One Act, 75 minutes

Synopsis:
March 1996. 30-something Marge’s reverie about the single man on her milk carton is interrupted by the news — broadcast by the mysterious Blondie — that a teller at the local bank is dead and that there are still no leads in the ten-year old theft of a carton of milk from Sam’s 24 Hour Market. Marge’s seven-year old son Jackie tells her that his younger sister and he poisoned the cookies they gave the bank teller. As the police arrive, Marge flees, leaving her children to fend for themselves.

Limping along the highway, Marge accepts a ride from Bruce, the man on the milk carton. On the run from “milk,” a conspiratorial corporate entity, Bruce persuades her to join him in a quest to find Rufus, a reputed freelance version of the witness protection program rumored to be somewhere in Montana. Their quest takes them through Nevada and Idaho, as they steal cars, break into slot machines, rearrange dairy cases and yell “fire” in a half-crowded theater — and eventually follow Blondie to a dairy farm in Montana. Will Rufus give them the new identies they crave? What about Marge’s children? And what if the milk conspiracy turns out to be reality . . ?

“Dorf has a wonderful knack for writing snappy, slyly politically incorrect dialogue, which feels like a collaboration between Woody Allen and David Mamet . . . beguiling . . .”
– Backstage

Most of of Milk and Cookies may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button. To obtain a complete reading copy, please see the Contact Information on this page.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Jonathan Dorf
7125 De Longpre Ave. #209
Los Angeles, CA
USA 90046
E-mail: jon@jondorf.com
Playwright’s website: www.jonathandorf.com

About the Playwright: Jonathan Dorf has had his plays produced across the United States, as well as in several foreign countries, including stagings of his work by Walnut Street Theatre, Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, Ensemble Studio Theatre – LA and the Pittsburgh New Works Festival. Mr. Dorf is the co-chair of the Alliance of Los Angeles Playwrights, the former managing director of the Philadelphia Dramatists Center and a member of the Dramatists Guild of America. He has also written several produced short screenplays and a number of feature scripts.

In addition to writing for stage and screen, he serves as the resident playwriting expert for Final Draft: he created “Ask the Expert” Playwriting for their scriptwriting software and also writes a column about playwriting for their website. He is resident playwriting expert for The Writers Store, for whom he created Playwriting 101.com, and he also contributes regularly to their e-zine. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College with a degree in dramatic writing and literature and holds an MFA in playwriting from UCLA. He is available to playwrights and screenwriters as a script consultant.

Milk and Cookies premiered at the Sidewalk Studio Theatre, Burbank, California, 2008.

Miracle Mile by Josepha Gutelius

Comedy/ 7 Characters, 3 Men (one double), 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis:
Miracle Mile may remind you of Shakespeare’s Tempest — only now it is the scary future, and the wizard is a young scientist (and the daughter of the President of the U.S.) who unleashes a catastrophic weather war, with hilarious results.

Miracle Mile should join the repertoire of imaginative as well as innovative comedies.” –Times Herald Record

Miracle Mile is a gem. Gutelius adds delightful twists, and turns the world upside down and inside out to give a new perspective to our follies. This play is a must-see.” –Poughkeepsie Journal

“Gutelius presents a series of socio-political issues that are downright mind-boggling. Going for comedy, she deals with matters of high explosive-conflictive nature. It’s all done in tongue-in-cheek and is positively hilarious. But it is also serious, thought-provoking, and quite disturbing stuff [that will] send the audience home with plenty of material for thought and speculation.” – Kingston Daily Freeman

“It is hard to characterize Miracle Mile, which may be its primary charm and appeal. Neither formulaic nor heavy on message, it poses ever so lightly some questions about the meaning of human life . . . with an inventiveness [that is] disarmingly and infectiously entertaining . . . For a delightful evening of theater, it is sure to please.” – Woodstock Times

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Josepha Gutelius
122 Burt St.
Saugerties, NY
USA 12477
Phone Number: (845) 246-4058
E-mail: josephanina@aol.com
Alternate E-mail: jgutelius@yahoo.com

About the Playwright: Josepha Gutelius’s other plays include The Age of Anxiety, RASP, Spooking Herald, Is It June Where You Are?, Desperate Alien, and Veronica Cory, as well as the short plays Two Hands, Vaseline, and Atomica World Machine.

Miracle Mile was first produced at Performing Arts of Woodstock, Woodstock, NY, in 1989.

Moosebreath, Maine by Bob Jensenius

Comedy-Farce/ 7 Characters, 4 Women, 3 Men/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis:
June Midcalf, a soon to be divorced businessperson, is transferred to Moosebreath, Maine. She is to start a new sales division for her company. June mysteriously discovers the real reason for her transferred is so Meredith, the owner of the company, and her soon to be ex sister-in-law, can fire her.

Why does Meredith want to fire her? What can June do?

Tired of being pushed around, June has a plan of her own to get even. She hires employees that are antithetical to the “corporate image” and her own ethical standards. Why should June care? She is not going to have to supervise these malcontents. She is going to be fired — or is she?

* Warning: The Surgeon General has determined that if you fall in any of the following categories you read this play at your own risk: accountants, people who won’t use trees, Volvo drivers, men who golf, topless dancers, wives of men who golf, Ford Bronco owners, psychologists, people with values, people without values, beer drinkers and users of Preparation H.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Bob Jensenius
4160 Wilshire Dr.
York, Pennsylvania
USA 17402
Phone: (D) 888-878-9675 X3012
(N) 717-757-2525
bjensenius@yahoo.com

About the Playwright: Bob Jensenius’ work has received numerous awards during the past four years. He has been a finalist in the 1999 McLaren Memorial Comedy Playwriting competition, a finalist in the 1999/2000 Blowing Rock Stage Company competition, selected to the New York City Playwrights Festival, and winner of York Little Theatre’s Black Box Production. His work has received staged readings at the American Renegade Theatre in Hollywood, CA. and productions at The Theatre Studio Inc., New York City and York Little Theatre in York, Pa.

Bob lives in York, Pennsylvania with his wife Billie and two children. He has served on the Board of Governors of York Little Theatre, and has many broadcasting and business credits to his name.

Bob holds a BS degree with honors in accounting from York College, a BS degree in political science from Shepherd College, and an MS degree in communications from Shippensberg University. Despite all these degrees, Bob still has difficulty coloring between the lines.

Moosebreath, Maine was first seen at York Little Theatre in December 1998, and made its Off-Off Broadway premiere at the Theatre Studio Inc. in August 2000. It has won various awards.

Mothers Have Nine Lives By Joanna Alexandra Norland

Mothers Have Nine Lives

Comedy-Drama/ 12 characters, 1 to 12 female actors/ One Act

Synopsis:
Kim needs a double stroller for her twin daughter. Now. Marge jetsets from the boardroom to the nursery, and back. Double time. And Kim will convince the powers-that-be that her daughter deserves a place in the gifted students class. Fasten your seatbelts for a 45-minute whistle stop tour of the highs and lows of modern motherhood. Nine mothers, nine monologues, and nine stories, interlinked by the games of three girls who know one thing for sure: Being the mommy is the best part.

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Contact information: Amateur and professional rights:
Joanna Alexandra Norland
3 Back Lane
Godden Green, Kent
UK, TN15 OJH
Tel: 011 44 (0) 1732 761 864
E-mail: joanna.norland@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Joanna Alexandra Norland’s one-act play Mothers Have Nine Livespremiered in the 1992 Young Playwrights Festival at Playwrights Horizons in new York. The script has since received productions at various London venues including the Bridewell Theatre, in 2002, and the Tabard Theatre, in 2007. Joanna’s work has also been showcased in London at Soho Theatre, Hampstead Theatre, and the Theatre Museum. Her short play, Lydia Reconsiders, which champions Lydia Bennet, the black sheep of Pride and Prejudice, was selected as a finalist in the 2004 National Ten-Minute Play Contest sponsored by the Actors Theatre of Louisville.Her first full-length play, Lizzy, Darcy and Jane (originally entitled Jane Austen Makes a Match) premiered at the Bath Jane Austen Festival in 2006, and was produced by the C Company at the Tabard Theatre, London in 2008. It is published on ProPlay and by Samuel French Ltd.Joanna has a B.A. from Brown University, Rhode Island, an M.Phil. from King’s College, Cambridge, and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She lives in Kent, England.

Mothers Have Nine Lives was first produced by Playwrights Horizon, New York City in 1992.

Multiple Choice by Alan Rossett

Comedy/ 2 Characters, 1 Man, 1 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis:
Parsifal Samsondale, a middle-aged millionaire with suicidal tendencies, returns to his home town. At midnight, all his past loves eerily appear, through the body and voice of Madame Jo. Is she an authentic psychic medium — or a dangerous quack? Or perhaps an ordinary housewife who’ll stop at nothing to get her hands on Parsi’s wealth?

“Two extraordinarily dynamic actors in a play that’s hilariously funny, and ultimately very moving. Both realistic and surrealistic, with its detective story plot, in itself intriguing. I won’t give away the end.”
International Herald Tribune

“The shattering encounter between a hypocritically well-behaved man and an outrageously improper lady, written with Alan Rossett’s invigorating sense of humor.”
Paris Capital, April 1997

“A tasty comedy, brilliantly interpreted, transforming the Essaion Theatre into the salon of a seeress, meting out punishment and redemption. Scathing humor but also real humanity characterize this ‘parapsychological’ comedy.”
Astro News, March 1997

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Alan Rossett
91, rue Nollet
75017 Paris
France
Ph.: (33) (0) 1 42 63 98 14
Email: rossdoal@aol.com

About the Playwright: “Cocteau meets Woody Allen” was film-director Jean Delannoy’s comment on Alan Rossett, the only American to have French language plays produced regularly in France . . . and to receive awards from the Centre National des Lettres. Born in Detroit, he began his career as an actor in New York, where he appeared for a season with the Living Theatre and also as James Earl Jones’ first Iago. Relocating in Paris, he wrote and directed an evocation of Montmartre Light and Shade with Charles Boyer. Then his comedy High Time went from London to Sydney to New York (at the Actors Studio) and wound up, translated, in a Parisian cafe theatre before transferring to La Bruyere, a Broadway category house.Rossett made the language cross-over into French with two plays set in restaurants which he staged in the midst of diners at a show biz hang-out, running 200 performances.

Many other productions followed of his French-language plays, including How It Happened, Cat As Cat Can, Love On Ice, Calamity Jane. Au Pair Girls premiered in Paris and was revived successfully at the Avignon Festival where it was nominated for a PIAF as comedy of the year.His French plays are published by Avant-Scene Theatre, Editions des quatre-vents, Editions Art et Comedie et Librairie Theatrale. He has adapted into English many of his own works as well as a series of plays by colleagues that have received grants from the Beaumarchais Association of the French Author’s Society. Rossett has done English versions as well of Alain Decaux’s historical pagaents (Chateau Blois Comes To Life and De Gaulle: the Man Who Said NO. As an actor, he has appeared in films of Marcel Carné, Woody Allen, and over 50 others.

Multiple Choice premiered at the Theatre Deque, Belfort, France, and subsequently tranferrred to the Essaïon Théâtre, Paris.

My Heart and the Real World by Broken Gopher Ink

Comedy-Drama (monologues)/ Multiple Characters, 5 actors minimum, 3 Men, 2 Women/ One acts, written in 3 parts to be performed over 3 nights

Synopsis: (From the off-off-Broadway Review): “Sketches that can only be described as edgy, dealing with alienation, despair, and loathing (of oneself and others). Which sketches are presented on any given night is decided randomly . . .lives with his middle-aged mother, Geg, and is “in a relationship” with Lindahl, but his real love is his drums. Maybe you’d prefer making loud sounds to growing-up, too, if your Mother was having sex with your cousin (her nephew, that’s right) and your girlfriend wants to bring her “emotional heart into harmonious balance.”

“Among them were ‘Everybody’s Trying to Be My Baby,’ narrated by a woman who fucked all four Beatles (and their manager/pimp) and fantasizes about the child she had to give up nine months later. While loaded with a narcotized horror on one level (she was 14 when she let herself be led back to the Fab Four’s hotel), the piece bubbles with an undertone of humor, pointed up by casual details (the squalor of the hotel suite; one Beatle’s bad breath; another’s breaking into tears after sex).”

Another standout was ‘Don’t Touch the President’s Brain,’ a reminiscence by a cleaning woman who happened to be in the emergency room when President Kennedy was brought in after getting shot. The title is a quote from a Secret Service man who tells her off after she accidentally picks up part of Kennedy’s brain.”

Other [characters] included a deranged Trekkie obsessed with Deanna Troy; a harassing caller who gets children to divulge secrets, and then uses that information in subsequent harassing calls to the parents; and a manic but ultimately depressing attendee at a reunion. Not a straight arrow in the quiver.

“The final sketch, a funeral eulogy, has the priest dissing God in ever-more-bitter terms. It sums up the sense of futility that underlies all the sketches’ weirdness.”

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Broken Gopher Ink
1521 9th Ave
Greeley, Colorado
USA 80631
Ph.: 970-352-7898
brokengopher@hotmail.com
Playwrights’ website: http://www.brokengopher.com

About the Playwright: Broken Gopher Ink’s plays have been produced by Love Creek Productions, The Harold Clurman Theatre, The American Theatre of Actors, The Quartz Theatre, The Soupstone Project, Beverly Hills Cable Access, Ironbound Theatre, and Theatre Three (N.Y.C.), to name only a precious few. Their fabulous and nonfattening plays, all of which have been aggressively rejected by the Denver Center, are: M.I.B. (1987),Murder in the Men’s Store (1988), Stigmata (1989), Clazion Catches Light (1991), Confetti (1993), My Heart and the Real World (1998) and Hurt(2000). Their work has won numerous cheap awards, including the 1995 Love Creek One Act Festival in New York City, which resulted in a visit from the unstable pair.

My Heart and the Real World was first produced by Love Creek Productions at The American Theatre of Actors, New York City in October, 2000.

Neverland by Jonathan Dorf

Dark comedy/ 3 Characters, 1 Man, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

The first act of Neverland may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To purchase a complete reading copy, click here.

Synopsis: Young Wendy decides, with the help of the imaginary J.M., that her friend Peter is “the one.” Thus begins an epic pursuit. Each time Peter moves on in life, Wendy reinvents herself and reappears. But each time she gets close to the downward spiraling Peter, who has run away from home and ended up in juvenile hall, prison and on the street, she can’t quite get herself to tell him who she is or of her “love.”

Her repeated failures push her over the edge, and one afternoon the tables turn and Peter follows her. Wendy takes refuge on the ledge of her apartment. Can Wendy and Peter battle off their fears of the future and the ghosts of the past, represented by a couple of nasty hallucinatory characters, to have their long-delayed reunion?

The first act of Neverland may be read by clicking on the “Read It Now” button above. To purchase a complete reading copy, click here.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Original Works Publishing
4611 1/2 Ambrose Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90027
info@originalworks.com
Publisher’s website: originalworksonline.com/
Playwright’s Website: www.jonathandorf.com

About the Playwright: Jonathan Dorf has had his plays produced across the United States, as well as in several foreign countries, including stagings of his work by Walnut Street Theatre, Playwrights Theatre of New Jersey, Ensemble Studio Theatre – LA and the Pittsburgh New Works Festival. Mr. Dorf is the co-chair of the Alliance of Los Angeles Playwrights, the former managing director of the Philadelphia Dramatists Center and a member of the Dramatists Guild of America. He has also written several produced short screenplays and a number of feature scripts.

In addition to writing for stage and screen, he serves as the resident playwriting expert for Final Draft: he created “Ask the Expert” Playwriting for their scriptwriting software and also writes a column about playwriting for their website. He is resident playwriting expert for The Writers Store, for whom he created Playwriting 101.com, and he also contributes regularly to their e-zine. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College with a degree in dramatic writing and literature and holds an MFA in playwriting from UCLA. He is available to playwrights and screenwriters as a script consultant.

Neverland was first produced by the City Theater Company, Wilmington, Delaware.

Nights at the Round Table by William Missouri Downs & Lou Anne Wright

Comedy/ 7 Characters, 4 Women, 3 Men (plus extras)/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Nights at the Round Table is a love story which takes place in a quirky little rural bar. With a clientele of farmers, peat moss salesmen, and even old political candidates, it seems like time took a right at the county line and missed the Round Table completely.

Presiding over the bar are the bashful Harry and the unflappable Hazel, co-owners. Tonight they’re celebrating a recent turn of events in Harry’s usually fumbling love life. He’s met Diane, a new resident who, like Harry, is looking for love and a quiet life.

The “Governor,” a perennial candidate, is the bar’s favorite patron. In the 50’s he was a serious contender for the office, but after losing two close elections he has given up. The only reason he continues to campaign is because his father left a will which states he must run for office to get the money. He doesn’t even bother to give original speeches anymore, instead cribbing from other famous politicians. Farmers have come from as far away as Moline to hear tonight’s pontification.

Complications arise when Harry discovers that Diane has a husband: a recent parolee and no one to mess with. Diane begs Harry not to make a stand. She needn’t have bothered; Harry is an inveterate invertebrate.

Once again, Harry is a failure with love. With the election returns, the Governor grapples with his own disillusionment and lost dreams. It occurs to the Governor that he and Harry are the same kind of person – the kind that accepts failure.

Encouraged by Hazel, they both set out to change their lives, but fate is against them. Diane’s husband shows up and terrorizes the bar.

In the end, Diane’s husband is subdued, the “Governor” delivers his first original speech in twenty years, and Diane and Harry fall in love.

Nights at the Round Table is four square fun with a plenty of laughs and lots of action.”
– The Omaha Star

“Prime farce.”
– The Omaha World-Herald

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
William Missouri Downs
PO Box 83
Centennial, Wyoming, USA 8205
Ph: (307) 742-8879
University phone: (307) 766-2227
E-mail: Downs@uwyo.edu
http://uwyo.edu/thd2/Downs/DOWNS.html

About the Playwrights: William Missouri Downs holds an M.F.A. in acting from the University of Illinois and an M.F.A. in screenwriting from U.C.L.A. He studied playwriting for several years at the Circle Rep. in New York. He has authored a dozen plays, including Kabuki Medea which won the Bay Area Critics Award for best production in San Francisco, Jewish Sports Heroes and Texas Intellectuals which took first place at the Mill Mountain Theatre’s Festival Of New Plays and Dead White Males which was a semi-finalist in Eugene O’Neill. Bill’s plays have been produced from New York to Singapore, from the Kennedy Center to the Berkeley Rep. In addition to writing plays, Bill is the author of the books Playwriting: From Formula To Form and Screenplay: Writing The Picture, both published by Harcourt Brace. In Hollywood, he wrote for such NBC sitcoms as “My Two Dads,” “Amen” and “Fresh Prince Of Bel Air,” won the Jack Nicholson Award for screenwriting and sold the movie Executive Privilege to Tri-star. He is a member of the Denver Center’s Playwright’s Unit.

Lou Anne Wright holds an MFA in Voice, Speech and Dialects from the National Theatre Conservatory. She co-wrote the play Kabuki Medea which won the Jefferson Award for Best Production in Chicago. It was also produced at the Kennedy Center. She is co-author of the book Playwriting: From Formula to Formpublished by Harcourt Brace. Her screenwriting credits include the film adaptation of Eudora Welty’s The Hitch-Hikers, which featured Patty Duke and Richard Hatch (and for which she was nominated for the Directors Guild of America’s Lillian Gish award). As an actor, she has appeared in regional repertory productions of The Last Night of Ballyhoo, The Seagull and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.

Nights at the Round Table was first produced at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington (State), and received its professional premiere at the Firehouse Theatre, Omaha, Nebraska in 1987.