Albert Finney Doesn’t Live Here Anymore by John Chambers

Comedy-Drama/ 3 characters, 2 Men, 1 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Steve is a disillusioned working class man. Liberated by the heady mix of music and radical politics in the ’60s and ’70s, the ’80s saw all his hopes of something better come to nothing. His teenage son “Lud” never held out any hope. He’s a Generation X-er — which adds to Steve’s frustrations. Steve’s wife Cath is caught between the warring factions. Her journey — and her direct action — becomes collective action. Can any of them see light at the end of the tunnel . . .

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
John Chambers
Email: artistan38@tiscali.co.uk

About the Playwright: John has had some 40 plays premiered in his native North West of England — ranging from a Number One tour to fringe. He has written for most Reps in the region and was Arts Council Resident Dramatist at Manchester LTC and Resident Writer at M6 Theatre. His plays have subsequently been performed around the UK and as far afield as Australia and the US. He’s also written over a hundred hours of TV drama, as well as plays for radio.

Albert Finney Doesn’t Live Here Anymore was first performed at Manchester LTC, 1997.

Hope & Fury by William Allen Brooks

Comedy/ 3 characters, 1 Man, 2 Women/ One Act

Synopsis: A quirky and touching story of two estranged sisters who come to their childhood home for the first time in eight years. Their mother has recently passed on, but not before she put it in her will that the two of them will have to sort through a life’s worth of pack-rat’s junk before they can sell the lucrative property. If that isn’t enough to send these strong women around the bend, then the fact that their sworn enemy, the grocery delivery boy/ex-boyfriend/trouble maker, has been named as executor to their mother’s estate certainly is. The name of the game is following these two equally loveable and hate-able people through tickle fights, three bottles of gin and a whole lot of memories as they try to patch together who they are, who they were, and who they will be.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
William Brooks
204 Hilliard St. E.
Saskatoon, SK.
Canada
S7J 0E4
Ph.: (306) 934-8278 or (306) 341-4089
e-mail: williamallenbrooks@yahoo.ca
Playwright’s website: www.williambrooks.ca

About the Playwright: William is a playwright and actor living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. As a playwright, two of his plays, The Captive and Hope & Fury, have been featured at the Saskatchewan Playwrights Centre’s Spring Festival of New plays. Hope & Fury was premiered in Saskatoon in May of 2005 produced by Flux Theatre, followed by a production at Calgary’s Lunchbox Theatre. His youth play, Assignment: Impossible was toured by Persephone Theatre in 2006. His plays have also been seen at Globe Theatre’s On the Line and the University of Saskatchewan. As an actor, William’s work has been seen with Persephone Theatre, Quest Theatre, Vertigo Mystery Theatre, Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan, As-Q Theatre and Last Exit Theatre, among others.

Hope & Fury was first was first seen in The Saskatchewan Playwrights Centre’s Spring Festival of New Plays, May, 2004 as a staged reading, and premiered by Flux Theatre in May, 2005

 

Assignment: Impossible by William Allen Brooks

Comedy/ 4 characters, 2 Men, 2 Women/ One Act

Synopsis: Three students (Janice, Beth, and Paul) and one teacher (Mr. Ankart) have all been sentenced to a special weekend detention by Mrs. Donnelly, the school principal. Each of them is in hot water with the principal for their own reasons. Partly as punishment and partly as a last chance to redeem themselves, the four have been given a special task in this day long detention. It is the job of these four to come up with some sort of presentation on teen sex issues and present it to the rest of the school on Monday.

When the students are uncooperative in their attempts to form the presentation, Mr. Ankart pulls out the script that he has written for the day. It turns out to be far from anything that the student body would care about. Secretly, Janice writes her own script. When Monday morning rolls around, she takes over the stage from Mr. Ankart and holds a vote with the student audience to see which play they want to hear. Naturally, they choose hers.

All four characters take on roles in the play and tell the story of two couples at a party (Britney/Kevin and Cameron/Justin) trying to make decisions about sex in their lives.

In the play-within-the-play, Cameron, who has had sex before, convinces her friend Britney that she should have sex with her boyfriend Kevin if she wants to keep him around. On the boy’s side, Cameron’s date, Justin, tells Kevin that he has to go for it as well. The two couples leave the party early, but at the last minute Britney and Kevin decide not to go through with it.

The next Monday at school, Britney overhears Kevin and Justin sharing bedroom stories from the weekend. When she hears Kevin lying about what happened she confronts him with a slap in the face. Feeling awful about what he has done, Kevin tells the truth to the whole school over the intercom system. Inspired, Cameron tells the truth about her weekend, too.

Once the truth is out in the open, all four characters have the opportunity to talk honestly about what they’re feeling. They can work through all of the questions that they each have surrounding this difficult issue and come to the conclusions that are right for them.

And backstage, after the play, the actors share some surprises of their own.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
William Brooks
204 Hilliard St. E.
Saskatoon, SK.
Canada
S7J 0E4
Ph.: (306) 934-8278 or (306) 341-4089
e-mail: williamallenbrooks@yahoo.ca
Playwright’s website: www.williambrooks.ca


About the Playwright: William is a playwright and actor living in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. As a playwright, two of his plays, The Captive and Hope & Fury, have been featured at the Saskatchewan Playwrights Centre’s Spring Festival of New plays. Hope & Fury was premiered in Saskatoon in May of 2005 produced by Flux Theatre, followed by a production at Calgary’s Lunchbox Theatre. His youth play, Assignment: Impossible was toured by Persephone Theatre in 2006. His plays have also been seen at Globe Theatre’s On the Line and the University of Saskatchewan. As an actor, William’s work has been seen with Persephone Theatre, Quest Theatre, Vertigo Mystery Theatre, Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan, As-Q Theatre and Last Exit Theatre, among others.

Assignment: Impossible was first produced by Persephone Theatre in Saskatoon on tour in 2006.

Confetti by Broken Gopher Ink

Comedy-Drama/ 7 characters, 5 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, 35 scenes

Synopsis: Gary lives with his middle-aged mother, Geg, and is “in a relationship” with Lindahl, but his real love is his drums. Maybe you’d prefer making loud sounds to growing-up, too, if your Mother was having sex with your cousin (her nephew, that’s right) and your girlfriend wants to bring her “emotional heart into harmonious balance.”

But in 35 punchy, sardonic scenes punctuated with original songs, this smart and unsentimental comedy manages to suggest that even someone as messed-up as Gary can manage to achieve, if not harmonious balance, a degree less mess-uppedness.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Broken Gopher Ink,
1521 9th Ave,
Greeley, Colorado,
USA, 80631.
Ph.: 970-356-4893
Email: brokengopher@hotmail.com
Playwrights Website: www.brokengopher.com

About the Playwright:Broken Gopher Ink are a pair of humble westerners whose delightfully crude and vicious plays have been produced all over the USA and small parts of Europe, but especially in New York City off-Broadway theatres, where Broken Gopher Ink acquired their bogus literary credibility. No one is sure who they are or what they want, but their deliciously low cholesterol mega-monologue play, My Heart and the Real World, has received eight separate off-Broadway productions (including two UK shows) thus cementing Broken Gopher Ink‘s reputation as cult failures.

Confetti was premiered at The American Theatre of Actors, in New York City, October, 1995.

Also by Broken Gopher Ink:
My Heart and the Real World

 

 

 

 

 

That Darn Plot! by David Belke

Comedy/ 6 characters, 4 Men, 1 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Mark W. Transom, one of Canada’s greatest playwrights, is at the end of his rope. In order to fulfill his contract to artistic director and old friend Jo Harber, he has to create a play in one night or lose everything. Half asleep and half drunk, Transom starts putting theatrical personalities he knows into a simple comedy about putting on a play. As the characters come to life before his eyes, the play seems to be progressing well until, unbidden and without warning, Transom’s son Lloyd appears as a character and the play takes on a life of its own. As the playwright struggles to maintain the upper hand, the out of control writing process brings him closer and closer to the heart of his estrangement with his son. Hilarious and heartfelt, That Darn Plot is a comedy about playwriting, rehearsals, rewriting and rehabilitating reality as well as a sympathetic look at a creative writer who is unable to connect with the people around him, including his only child.

“Fun stuff, and like the booze-and-panic-fueled writing session it depicts,That Darn Plot! moves with manic speed . . . thanks to the spot-on script loaded with great one-liners and scads of crisp dialogue.”
– See Magazine (Edmonton)

“Clever and fast-paced . . . . a hysterical (and sometimes genuinely touching) show.”
– ebhm.org

“Pretty darn funny . . . . sure to entertain anyone with an interest in the process of theatre, or a hankering to be a writer.”
Birmingham News

Winner of the 2000 Samuel French Canadian Playwriting Contest

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
David Belke
10037 84 Avenue
Edmonton Alberta
T6E 2G6
phone (780) 437-7507
Contact form: http://www.davidbelke.ca/index.php/contact-david


About the Playwright: David Belke was born in Winnipeg, Canada but was raised and continues to flourish in Edmonton, Alberta. He graduated from the University of Alberta with a B.Ed. and where he also studied stage design. He fills many different roles in the theatre: performer, producer, designer, teacher, and award-winning playwright. His plays have been performed across Canada as well as in the United States, England and Northern Ireland. His first full length play was produced for the 1990 Edmonton Fringe Theatre Festival, the largest theatre festival in North America. Since then, he has written a new play for each subsequent year becoming one of the Fringe’s mainstays and one of the city’s favorite playwrights. David currently works as resident playwright and designer with Edmonton’s Shadow Theatre where he is also an artistic associate. Shadow Theatre usually produces one of David’s plays a year, either a premiere or a remount. A multiple Sterling Award winner, David also received prestigious Samuel French Inc.’s Canadian Playwrights Award for 2000 and they have since published two of his plays. In addition, he is a cast member of Edmonton’s long-running comedy institution Die-Nasty, the live improvised soap opera. He also serves as a member of the Varscona Theatre Alliance Board and The Elizabeth Sterling Haynes Awards Committee.

Ten Times Two was first produced by Shadow Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta, 1999

If you prefer, click here to buy a printed copy

Ten Times Two by David Belke

Comedy/ 3 characters, 2 Men, 1 Woman/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: When an evildoer cursed with immortality falls for a barmaid in 1399, it is the start of a romantic pursuit spanning the Middle Ages to Modern times. But in order to win the heart of his reincarnating beloved, the villain must learn to become a human being.

“A romantic comedy that proves that time may be fickle but fate isn’t to blame.”
– Theatre & Company

“A fascinating concept . . . a funny, touching and clever script.”
– Kitchener Record

“A wise and witty evening.”
– See Magazine

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
David Belke
10037 84 Avenue
Edmonton Alberta
T6E 2G6
phone (780) 437-7507
Contact form: http://www.davidbelke.ca/index.php/contact-david


About the Playwright: David Belke was born in Winnipeg, Canada but was raised and continues to flourish in Edmonton, Alberta. He graduated from the University of Alberta with a B.Ed. and where he also studied stage design. He fills many different roles in the theatre: performer, producer, designer, teacher, and award-winning playwright. His plays have been performed across Canada as well as in the United States, England and Northern Ireland. His first full length play was produced for the 1990 Edmonton Fringe Theatre Festival, the largest theatre festival in North America. Since then, he has written a new play for each subsequent year becoming one of the Fringe’s mainstays and one of the city’s favorite playwrights. David currently works as resident playwright and designer with Edmonton’s Shadow Theatre where he is also an artistic associate. Shadow Theatre usually produces one of David’s plays a year, either a premiere or a remount. A multiple Sterling Award winner, David also received prestigious Samuel French Inc.’s Canadian Playwrights Award for 2000 and they have since published two of his plays. In addition, he is a cast member of Edmonton’s long-running comedy institution Die-Nasty, the live improvised soap opera. He also serves as a member of the Varscona Theatre Alliance Board and The Elizabeth Sterling Haynes Awards Committee.

Ten Times Two was first produced by Shadow Theatre, Edmonton, Alberta, 1999

If you prefer, click here to buy a printed copy.

A Night In The Kremlin — Book by Bernard Besserglik, Music & Lyrics by Bob Barton

Musical Comedy/ Multiple characters, playable by 10 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis (from newyorktheatre.com): “A Night in the Kremlin is a wonderfully imaginative look at what happens when Harpo Marx travels to Moscow in 1933 amidst the building of the Soviet Union’s ‘Utopia.’ Once Harpo arrives he receives an interpreter, Valentina, and he befriends the Foreign Diplomat’s English wife, Ivy. After the two women take him to an audition at the Chekhov Theater (a hilarious moment), Valentina breaks down with unbearable grief. She shares with Harpo and Ivy that her boyfriend, Igor, is going to have to stand before the Party Committee to be judged and that it is likely he may be sent away. After getting all the details Harpo and Ivy both decide that Igor is being treated unfairly and that they will do whatever it takes to ensure that Valentina and Igor can live together without corrupt politics. So they go to Stalin!

“Stalin is deeply concerned with maintaining the Soviet Union and ensuring that it is for the working people. It is as he receives the good news that the US is recognizing the USSR that he encounters Harpo and Ivy. Unaware of the duo’s mission to challenge the Party Committee’s decision, Stalin starts to fall in love with Ivy. In turn, Ivy, uses her feminine ways to try to sway Stalin to reverse the committee’s eventual decision to send Igor away. Meanwhile Harpo attempts to use his comedic antics to trick and confuse Stalin into signing official papers to release Igor.”

Harpo met Stalin? Well, actually no. But he did visit Moscow in November 1933 as a kind of goodwill ambassador following the opening of US-Soviet diplomatic relations. We can imagine the rest.

Although Harpo is clearly the main character, Stalin runs him a close second. A set-piece scene at the close of the first act plays on Stalin’s (approximate) physical resemblance to Groucho Marx and the fact that Stalin was known to have a wicked sense of humour — of the dark variety, obviously.

Though the play’s humour is often farcical, the story structure is firmly based on historical reality and many of the events portrayed — for example, Stalin kissing ambassador Bullitt full on the lips — actually happened. Though enjoyment is the ultimate goal, the show aims also to cast a shaft of light on one of the great tragedies of the 20th century.

“A wonderfully imaginative look at what happens when Harpo Marx travels to Moscow in 1933 amidst the building of the Soviet Union’s “Utopia” . . . Although it would be very easy to assume that a musical about the Soviet Union might be dark, the musical numbers are primarily light and fun . . . Then there are sweet love songs . . . Overall a great time. I had a wonderful night at the Kremlin!”
– Michael Lockley, nytheatre.com


Bernard Besserglik interviewed about A Night in the Kremlin

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Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
Bernard Besserglik
E-mail: besserglik@wanadoo.fr
Production website: www.a-night-in-the-kremlin.com
Address: 21 rue Eugène et ML Cornet
PANTIN
93500 France

About the Playwright: Bernard Besserglik was born in London and lives in Paris. A former foreign correspondent (and still a regular film critic), he spent four years in Moscow and is interested in all things Russian. For the past 10 years he has written screenplays, mostly in French but also some in English. He has a short film currently in production and several other projects under option. He is currently writing I Spied for Stalin, a love-story set in wartime Moscow, for Lark Productions (UK). He first collaborated with Bob Barton on the musicalLash Me to the Mast, Adrian Mitchell’s take on the Odyssey.

About the Composer/Lyricist: Bob Barton studied musical theory when young and has played jazz as a solo artist and with bands since his teens, touring the US extensively. He has written original scores and lyrics and arranged existing music ranging stylistically from pop to classical for publicity and educational films and videos. He is adept in all styles, ranging from blues and boogie to pop and rock. His influences come from the great tradition of jazz piano players: Fats Waller, Earl Hines, Bud Powell, Oscar Peterson, etc., but he has developed his own unmistakeable personal style.

A Night In The Kremlin premiered at the Midtown International Theatre Festival, New York in August, 2009.

Sample songs:

Track & Field by Kevin Barry

Comedy/ 4 characters, 2 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis (from Cincinnati City Beat): “At a very superficial level Track & Field is about a middle-aged college theater professor who is enamored of a female student athlete. He’s trying to write a play, but his sarcastic wife questions his literary and and personal judgement, while the athlete’s equally athletic — and abusive — boyfriend, also an aspiring actor, is the object of his scorn.

“But that’s not what Track & Field is really ‘about.’ Barry has created a witty piece that also hold theatrical conventions up to scrutiny, pushes them to extremes and turns them inside out. To get our attention, at one point, the playwright says he might take the beginning, middle, and end and rearrange them: The play’s conclusion does just that. There’s a ring-bindered script that gets carried around and read from — and occasionally disputed, disregarded, and disdained . . . .

“Barry’s play also draws some clever analogies between writing a play and running a marathon, from the warm up to the event’s climax to the cooling down. The professor tells the young athlete: ‘Surprise your mind. Come see a play with me.’ That’s clearly what Barry’s desire is, and that’s what he accomplishes with this script.”

“This show is a lot of fun to watch, if your idea of fun is to have your thoughts provoked and your preconceptions disrupted . . . . one hell of an interesting evening that will make anyone who loves theater think carefully about what it means to ‘sit in the dark and watch people pretending to be other people.'”
– Cincinnati City Beat

Nominated for the American Theatre Critics Association’s New Play Award, and its M. Elizabeth Osborn Award for up-and-coming playwright.

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Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Kevin Barry
Ph.: 513-831-4421
E-mail: barrywerks@cinci.rr.com

About the Playwright: Kevin Barry is a native New Yorker and a member of the Dramatists Guild, as well as a founding member of Cincinnati Playwrights Initiative. His plays include: I Will Love You at 8PM Next Wednesday (Los Angeles, Cincinnati), Remember I’ll Always Be True (Los Angeles, Cincinnati), The Secret of Durable Pigments (Denver), American Standard (Chicago, Denver, Cincinnati), Remembering Juliet (Cincinnati), Him (New York, Cincinnati), The Portable Max(Cincinnati), Distracted by the Landscape (Los Angeles), In Rebel Country (Cincinnati), and Track and Field (Cincinnati), which was also nominated for the American Theatre Critics Association Award.

Track & Field was first produced by the Know Theatre Tribe, Cincinnati, Ohio in June, 2001.

Saint Thea: A One-Act Play In Two Acts by D.T. Arcieri

Saint Thea

Comedy-Drama/ 5 characters, 3 Men, 2 Women / Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: A 17-year old boy learns the bizarre truth of his ancestry through the disparate memories of his wacky family members.

“Arcieri is clearly a playwright to be reckoned with.” – NY Newsday

 

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Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
D.T. Arcieri
E-mail: dtarcieri@aol.com

About the Playwright: D.T. Arcieri’s plays have been read and produced in America, England and Australia. They include the one-acts The Scream (All Out Arts, The Actors Institute, Moving Arts), Requiem for Albert (The Actors Institute, Vital Theatre, Bedlam Theatre), Drinking Zombies (Myriad Arts, Moving Arts), Norman! (Theatre Three, Theatre 40, Vital Theatre, Flesh Pot) and The Play About the Menu at Simon’s Coffee Shop (Theatre Three, Moving Arts). The Scream was optioned for a feature film by Tori Spelling and Drinking Zombies has been published by Original Works. His full-lengths includeModern Astrology (Theatre Conspiracy) and Cowbirds (Arena Theatre).Japanese Death Poem had a staged reading at Kitchen Dog Theatre in Dallas, Texas in 2004 and a full production at Theatre 40 in Los Angeles in 2005. Both were directed by Tony-nominated Stephen Tobolowsky, the latter starring Julie Hagerty. That play also won Stony Brook University’s 2005 John Gassner Festival.Carl a.k.a. Karl received a first reading and a staged reading in 2006 at Abingdon Theatre in New York. The Market, a prophetic one minute epic about the future of the US economy, premiered at the ‘Gone in 60 Seconds’ Festival at Brooklyn College in 2007. His newest full length St. Thea: A One-Act Play in Two Acts had a staged reading at Kitchen Dog in June 2009.

D.T. Arcieri holds MA degrees in Biological Sciences and Theatre Arts from Stony Brook University. He lives and writes on Long Island in New York and is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America

The Play About The Menu At Simon’s Coffee Shop premiered at Theatre Three’s Festival of One-Acts in March, 2008.

The Play About The Menu At Simon’s Coffee Shop by D.T. Arcieri

LA production at Moving Arts in October 2009

Comedy/ 4 characters, 2 Men (with doubling), 2 Women / One Act

Synopsis: Simon clearly needs to change more than just the menu at his coffee shop. This is a play about food and sex; about appetites that need to be satiated and all the things that happen when they are not.

“Arcieri is clearly a playwright to be reckoned with.” – NY Newsday

 

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and Professional Rights:
D.T. Arcieri
E-mail: dtarcieri@aol.com


About the Playwright
: D.T. Arcieri’s plays have been read and produced in America, England and Australia. They include the one-acts The Scream (All Out Arts, The Actors Institute, Moving Arts), Requiem for Albert (The Actors Institute, Vital Theatre, Bedlam Theatre), Drinking Zombies (Myriad Arts, Moving Arts), Norman! (Theatre Three, Theatre 40, Vital Theatre, Flesh Pot) and The Play About the Menu at Simon’s Coffee Shop (Theatre Three, Moving Arts). The Scream was optioned for a feature film by Tori Spelling and Drinking Zombies has been published by Original Works. His full-lengths include Modern Astrology (Theatre Conspiracy) and Cowbirds (Arena Theatre). Japanese Death Poem had a staged reading at Kitchen Dog Theatre in Dallas, Texas in 2004 and a full production at Theatre 40 in Los Angeles in 2005. Both were directed by Tony-nominated Stephen Tobolowsky, the latter starring Julie Hagerty. That play also won Stony Brook University’s 2005 John Gassner Festival.

Carl a.k.a. Karl received a first reading and a staged reading in 2006 at Abingdon Theatre in New York. The Market, a prophetic one minute epic about the future of the US economy, premiered at the ‘Gone in 60 Seconds’ Festival at Brooklyn College in 2007. His newest full length St. Thea: A One-Act Play in Two Acts had a staged reading at Kitchen Dog in June 2009.

D.T. Arcieri holds MA degrees in Biological Sciences and Theatre Arts from Stony Brook University. He lives and writes on Long Island in New York and is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America

The Play About The Menu At Simon’s Coffee Shop premiered at Theatre Three’s Festival of One-Acts in March 2008