The Scavenger’s Daughter by Gary Earl Ross

Drama-Mystery-Thriller/ 6 Characters, 3 Men, 3 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Part African-American family drama and part murder mystery, The Scavenger’s Daughter explores the impact of senile dementia and mental instability on a single family. When their father John is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, middle-aged Alan, Brian, and Connie Pickett find themselves in a virtual war with their unstable stepmother Ruthie, who at every turn—whether through ignorance, stubbornness, or insecurity—thwarts their efforts to secure John’s care and the family’s financial stability. Beginning at the scene of a murder-suicide that Detective Maxine Travis senses is really just murder, the play unfolds in police interrogations and a series of flashbacks. Travis must work her way through sibling conflicts, family secrets, and a case long cold until she understands what compelled Ruthie Pickett to point a gun at her husband and pull the trigger.

“A complex tale of our times . . . . Ross tells it well.” — The Buffalo News

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Professional rights:
Gary Earl Ross
228 Highgate Avenue
Buffalo, NY
USA, 14215
Ph: (716)308-0807
Email: geross@buffalo.edu

About the Playwright: Gary Earl Ross, a retired UB/EOC language arts professor, is the author of more than 200 published short stories, poems, articles, op-ed articles, scholarly papers, and public radio essays. His works include the short story collections The Wheel of Desire (2000) and Shimmerville (2002), the children’s story Dots (2002), the novels Blackbird Rising and Nickel City Blues (2017), and the stage plays Sleepwalker (2002), Picture Perfect (2007), The Best Woman (2007), Matter of Intent (winner of the 2006 Edgar Allan Poe Award from Mystery Writers of America), Murder Squared (2011), The Scavenger’s Daughter (2012), The Guns of Christmas (2014), The Mark of Cain (2016), and The Trial of Trayvon Martin (2017).

Ross’s plays have been performed in Buffalo, NY; New York, NY; Rochester, NY; Bend, OR; Knoxville, TN; Spring Lake, NJ; Kamsack, Saskatchewan, Canada; West Sussex, England; Manchester, England; London, England; Shanghai, China; Manipal, India; and Almaty, Kazakhstan. Ross edited Nickel City Nights (2008) and co-edited (with Gunilla Theander Kester) The Empty Chair: Love and Loss in the Wake of Flight 3407 (2010) and The Still Empty Chair (2011). Released in 2017 by Black Opal Books is Nickel City Blues, the first Buffalo-based Gideon Rimes mystery.

In addition to the Edgar, Ross’s honors include three Emanuel Fried Outstanding New Play Awards, a LIFT Fiction Fellowship, a Saltonstall Foundation Playwriting Fellowship, an ASI/DEC Fiction Grant, public radio commentary awards from the New York Associated Press and the New York Broadcasters Association, and numerous awards for teaching or professional, university, or community service. A member of the Just Buffalo Literary Center, the Dramatists Guild of America, Mystery Writers of America, International Thriller Writers, and the National Writers Union, Ross has written, directed, or acted in plays for Ujima Company, the Subversive Theatre Collective, New Phoenix Theater, Road Less Traveled Productions, and the Towne Players.

The Scavenger’s Daughter was first produced by Ujima Company, Buffalo, New York in  May, 2012.

Hello, Last Page Of My Life! by Julia Britton

Drama – Comedy/ 17 Characters, 7 Men, 4 Women, 6 Either/Or/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: The story of Anton Chekhov as seen from the perspective of the two women in his life: Actress Olga Knipper, his mistress and later wife, and his devoted sister Masha. They struggled, sometimes bitterly, for his love during his lifetime and, after his death, for their part in perpetuating his memory.

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Performance rights must be secured before production

Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Robert Chuter, robertjchuter@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Julia Britton (1914-2012) graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at The Stage Company (Adelaide, Australia), The Blue Room (Perth), La Mama (Carlton), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), and Theatreworks (Melbourne). Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia, and later performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide.

She wrote and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions, including Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea), Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne), and The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building).

Other plays include Hello, Last Page of My Life, Magdalena Amati, Somehow the Times Passes, and Internet Baby (all seen in readings at La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), and Mrs. Bloem.

Her music theatre includes Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron were produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; Best Play Award, ABC Radio, Queensland; and a nomination for the Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.

Hello, Last Page of My Life! was first performed at La Mama, Carlton, Australia in October, 2003.

7-10 Split by Michael G Wilmot

7-10 Split
Port Stanley Festival Theatre
Port Stanley, Ont., Canada

Comedy/ 4 Characters, 3 Men, 1 Woman or 2 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length – 2 Acts

Synopsis: Ever since Earl’s aspirations to become a pro bowler evaporated, his wife Brenda has put up with one get-rich-quick scheme after another. Not one to give up easily, Earl attempts to use the internet to find his way to “Easy Street”. A Crown Prince from an exotic foreign country is offering Earl millions just to help him get his fortune out of the country. Lacking seed money to put his exit plan into effect of course, the Crown Prince requires an “investment” from Earl to demonstrate good faith. Earl wasn’t born yesterday however (well maybe the day before yesterday), and devises what he thinks is a foolproof plan to turn the tables on the Prince.

“…the London playwright throws strike after strike, breaking funnybones along the way.
The laughs come fast and furious…”
– Entertainment Stage

“Michael Wilmot has rolled another strike with 7-10 Split!” – The Beat Magazine

“Wilmot has done it again with 7-10 Split. Audiences loved it!” – LiveAct, Whitby ON

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Professional rights:
Diane Carter
SRO Central
diane@srocentral.com
1-800-869-7351
Amateur rights:
Playwrights Guild of Canada

Amateur Rights Request Form

About the Playwright: Michael spent a number of years as an on-air radio personality before his love of theatre was sparked after being dragged to an audition to act as moral support for a friend.

His writing has been mainly in the field of comedy, including writing free-lance for Jay Leno’s “Tonight Show” monologue and for Kevin Nealon during his stint on Saturday Night Live‘s “Weekend Update” segment. For a time he also had regular columns in two U.S. comedy newsletters.

As a playwright, his scripts have been performed across the USA and Canada, in Australia and Russia. No Tell Motel has been translated into Russian (under the title Love Shack) and was performed in Astrakhan Russia in 2016. His short play Nancy is published by Playwrights Canada Press in their short play anthology Long Story Short.

He is a member of The Playwrights Guild of Canada and the Dramatists Guild of America.

7-10 Split was first performed at the Port Stanley Theatre Festival in Port Stanley, Ontario, Canada in July, 2011.

“This play will make you laugh till your sides split!” – ArtsNiagara.com

“Pure entertainment, not to be missed!” – Barbara Clifford, Markham Economist & Sun

Murder Squared by Gary Earl Ross

Murder Squared

Murder Squared
TheatreLoft
Buffalo, NY

Drama-Comedy/ 7-10 Characters, 3 Men, 3 Women, 1-4 Either/Or/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: Four stories, four crimes, four surprises. Four wildly different journeys into suspense and the unexpected make for one singular evening of mystery and the unexpected. Inspired by “The Twilight Zone” and “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” Murder Squared is a retro celebration of the classic suspense story. Includes “The Engineer,” “Anything for Money,” “The Heart of the Matter,” and “Return to Riverside Falls.”

“A most entertaining evening of theater.” — Buffalo News

“In addition to being playfully clever, these are delightfully fun and entertaining.”
Artvoice

Read it Now
Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Professional rights:
Gary Earl Ross
228 Highgate Avenue
Buffalo, NY
USA, 14215
Ph: (716)308-0807
Email: geross@buffalo.edu

About the Playwright: Gary Earl Ross, a retired UB/EOC language arts professor, is the author of more than 200 published short stories, poems, articles, op-ed articles, scholarly papers, and public radio essays. His works include the short story collections The Wheel of Desire (2000) and Shimmerville (2002), the children’s story Dots (2002), the novels Blackbird Rising and Nickel City Blues (2017), and the stage plays Sleepwalker (2002), Picture Perfect (2007), The Best Woman (2007), Matter of Intent (winner of the 2006 Edgar Allan Poe Award from Mystery Writers of America), Murder Squared (2011), The Scavenger’s Daughter (2012), The Guns of Christmas (2014), The Mark of Cain (2016), and The Trial of Trayvon Martin (2017).

Ross’s plays have been performed in Buffalo, NY; New York, NY; Rochester, NY; Bend, OR; Knoxville, TN; Spring Lake, NJ; Kamsack, Saskatchewan, Canada; West Sussex, England; Manchester, England; London, England; Shanghai, China; Manipal, India; and Almaty, Kazakhstan. Ross edited Nickel City Nights (2008) and co-edited (with Gunilla Theander Kester) The Empty Chair: Love and Loss in the Wake of Flight 3407 (2010) and The Still Empty Chair (2011). Released in 2017 by Black Opal Books is Nickel City Blues, the first Buffalo-based Gideon Rimes mystery.

In addition to the Edgar, Ross’s honors include three Emanuel Fried Outstanding New Play Awards, a LIFT Fiction Fellowship, a Saltonstall Foundation Playwriting Fellowship, an ASI/DEC Fiction Grant, public radio commentary awards from the New York Associated Press and the New York Broadcasters Association, and numerous awards for teaching or professional, university, or community service. A member of the Just Buffalo Literary Center, the Dramatists Guild of America, Mystery Writers of America, International Thriller Writers, and the National Writers Union, Ross has written, directed, or acted in plays for Ujima Company, the Subversive Theatre Collective, New Phoenix Theater, Road Less Traveled Productions, and the Towne Players.

Murder Squared was first performed on Saturday, November 27, 2010, at TheaterLoft in Buffalo.

The Tiger, the Brahman, and the Jackal by Mark Scrivener

Children & Youth/ 6 Characters, 6 Either/or/ One Act

Synopsis: A brahman lets the tiger out of the cage. The hungry tiger wants to eat him – can he find anyone who disagrees with the tiger and can help him? The buffalo, the bodhi tree and the road are no use and the jackal doesn’t seem to understand anything. Or does he?

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Mark Scrivener
63 Mountain Top Rd.
Georgica NSW 2480
Australia
Email: narrowroads@hotmail.com
Ph.: 612 66 888  113

About the Playwright: Mark Scrivener studied for three years at the Harkness Speech and Drama School, where his first play was produced when he was 20. Since then, his work has been seen at theatres including The Colonnade Theatre Company, Prometheus Productions, The Player’s Theatre Company, and The Rainbow Youth Theatre, among others. His verse play Narrow Roads to Inner Lands was broadcast on Oneword Radio in the UK, and he has had over 80 poems and other pieces published in Australian newspapers and magazines, including The Australian, The Sydney Morning Herald, Quadrant Magazine, The Bulletin, Poetry Australia, and The School Magazine.His poems have also been published in anthologies from Thomas Nelson and Co. and The Paterson Literary Review, while his verse translations have appeared in Poetry Australia, Quadrant, Meanjin, and The Australian. A Master of Letters graduate (with high distinction) from the University of New England in Armidale, Australia, Mark has also toured for over 25 years as a performance poet.

The Tiger, The Brahman and the Jackal was perfomed by The Colonnade Theatre Company (Primary School Touring in Sydney), The Player’s Theatre Company (in the Bondi Pavillion Theatre), The Rainbow Youth Theatre (in Lismore).

The Guns of Christmas by Gary Earl Ross

Drama/ 12 Characters, 12 Men/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: It is December 24, 1914, on the Western Front of the Great War. Two squads of soldiers—one British, one German—face each other across the ruined terrain of No Man’s Land, which holds both the bodies of their fallen comrades and the promise of certain death for anyone who attempts to reach the enemy trench. But it is Christmas Eve, and the bombardments trail off early. Then, in the darkness, someone begins to sing “Silent Night” and both sides recognize an opportunity for a brief peace unsanctioned by their commanders . . .

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Professional rights:
Gary Earl Ross
228 Highgate Avenue
Buffalo, NY
USA, 14215
Ph: (716)308-0807
Email: geross@buffalo.edu

About the Playwright: Gary Earl Ross, a retired UB/EOC language arts professor, is the author of more than 200 published short stories, poems, articles, op-ed articles, scholarly papers, and public radio essays. His works include the short story collections The Wheel of Desire (2000) and Shimmerville (2002), the children’s story Dots (2002), the novels Blackbird Rising and Nickel City Blues (2017), and the stage plays Sleepwalker (2002), Picture Perfect (2007), The Best Woman (2007), Matter of Intent (winner of the 2006 Edgar Allan Poe Award from Mystery Writers of America), Murder Squared (2011), The Scavenger’s Daughter (2012), The Guns of Christmas (2014), The Mark of Cain (2016), and The Trial of Trayvon Martin (2017).

Ross’s plays have been performed in Buffalo, NY; New York, NY; Rochester, NY; Bend, OR; Knoxville, TN; Spring Lake, NJ; Kamsack, Saskatchewan, Canada; West Sussex, England; Manchester, England; London, England; Shanghai, China; Manipal, India; and Almaty, Kazakhstan. Ross edited Nickel City Nights (2008) and co-edited (with Gunilla Theander Kester) The Empty Chair: Love and Loss in the Wake of Flight 3407 (2010) and The Still Empty Chair (2011). Released in 2017 by Black Opal Books is Nickel City Blues, the first Buffalo-based Gideon Rimes mystery.

In addition to the Edgar, Ross’s honors include three Emanuel Fried Outstanding New Play Awards, a LIFT Fiction Fellowship, a Saltonstall Foundation Playwriting Fellowship, an ASI/DEC Fiction Grant, public radio commentary awards from the New York Associated Press and the New York Broadcasters Association, and numerous awards for teaching or professional, university, or community service. A member of the Just Buffalo Literary Center, the Dramatists Guild of America, Mystery Writers of America, International Thriller Writers, and the National Writers Union, Ross has written, directed, or acted in plays for Ujima Company, the Subversive Theatre Collective, New Phoenix Theater, Road Less Traveled Productions, and the Towne Players.

The Guns of Christmas was first produced Subversive Theatre Collective in Buffalo, New York in December, 2014.

The Mark of Cain by Gary Earl Ross

Drama/ 15 Characters, 4 Men, 4 Women, 7 Either/Or — Doubling possible/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: It’s the summer of 1925. In a northern industrial city, Dr. Ossian Cain buys his dream house . . . in an all-white neighborhood. A mob attacks the house to force the Cains out. Someone inside fires a shot, someone outside dies, and Dr. Cain, his wife Alice, his daughter Lizbeth, and his brother Marcellus are all arrested for murder. Can celebrated “attorney for the damned” Charles Durham, just back from the Monkey Trial in Tennessee, save the Cain family from the electric chair?

“A fictionalized version of a civil rights trial in 1925 Detroit . . . . still intact is the Byronian figure of Ossian, the victorious ‘state of mind’ defense put forth by the cagey, folksy Charles Dunham — read Clarence Darrow here — plus pieces of dialogue taken from trial transcripts and Darrow’s seven hours of closing summation, stunning final minutes, a heartbreaking coda and hints of mystery, sleuthing and forensics.” — Buffalo News

“Compelling . . . . Everything works.” — The Buffalo News

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Gary Earl Ross
228 Highgate Avenue
Buffalo, NY
USA, 14215
Ph: (716) 308-0807
Email: geross@buffalo.edu
Playwright’s website: http://www.angelfire.com/journal/garyearlross/

About the Playwright: Gary Earl Ross, a retired UB/EOC language arts professor, is the author of more than 200 published short stories, poems, articles, op-ed articles, scholarly papers, and public radio essays. His works include the short story collections The Wheel of Desire (2000) and Shimmerville (2002), the children’s story Dots (2002), the novels Blackbird Rising and Nickel City Blues (2017), and the stage plays Sleepwalker (2002), Picture Perfect (2007), The Best Woman (2007), Matter of Intent (winner of the 2006 Edgar Allan Poe Award from Mystery Writers of America), Murder Squared (2011), The Scavenger’s Daughter (2012), The Guns of Christmas (2014), The Mark of Cain (2016), and The Trial of Trayvon Martin (2017).

Ross’s plays have been performed in Buffalo, NY; New York, NY; Rochester, NY; Bend, OR; Knoxville, TN; Spring Lake, NJ; Kamsack, Saskatchewan, Canada; West Sussex, England; Manchester, England; London, England; Shanghai, China; Manipal, India; and Almaty, Kazakhstan. Ross edited Nickel City Nights (2008) and co-edited (with Gunilla Theander Kester) The Empty Chair: Love and Loss in the Wake of Flight 3407 (2010) and The Still Empty Chair (2011). Released in 2017 by Black Opal Books is Nickel City Blues, the first Buffalo-based Gideon Rimes mystery.

In addition to the Edgar, Ross’s honors include three Emanuel Fried Outstanding New Play Awards, a LIFT Fiction Fellowship, a Saltonstall Foundation Playwriting Fellowship, an ASI/DEC Fiction Grant, public radio commentary awards from the New York Associated Press and the New York Broadcasters Association, and numerous awards for teaching or professional, university, or community service. A member of the Just Buffalo Literary Center, the Dramatists Guild of America, Mystery Writers of America, International Thriller Writers, and the National Writers Union, Ross has written, directed, or acted in plays for Ujima Company, the Subversive Theatre Collective, New Phoenix Theater, Road Less Traveled Productions, and the Towne Players.

The Mark of Cain was first produced by the Subversive Theatre Collective, Buffalo, NY in March, 2016.

Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime by Julia Britton

Comedy-Drama/ 15 Characters, 8 Men, 6 Women, 1 Either/Or/ Full Length, Two Acts

Based on the story by Oscar Wilde

Synopsis: A chiromantist reads Lord Arthur Savile’s palms and reveals that the distinguished gentleman is destined to commit a murder. Obsessed with the news, Lord Savile becomes concerned that he might murder his beloved fiancée, Sybil Merton. He finds a solution: Kill someone else instead.

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Performance rights must be secured before production

Contact information:
Robert Chuter
Email: robertjchuter@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Julia Britton (1914-2012) graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at The Stage Company (Adelaide, Australia), The Blue Room (Perth), La Mama (Carlton), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), and Theatreworks (Melbourne). Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia, and later performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide.

She wrote and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions, including Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea), Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne), and The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building).

Other plays include Hello, Last Page of My Life, Magdalena Amati, Somehow the Times Passes, and Internet Baby (all seen in readings at La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), and Mrs. Bloem.

Her music theatre includes Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron were produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; Best Play Award, ABC Radio, Queensland; and a nomination for the Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.

Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime was first read at Theatre 62 in Adelaide, Australia in 1975.

A Singular Man by Julia Britton

Drama/ 1 Character, 1 Man/ One act

Synopsis: English writer Christopher Isherwood relives and reviews his life at Cambridge University and in Nazi Germany, where he wrote the famous Berlin Stories (on which John Van Druten based his play I am a Camera and from which came the musical and film Cabaret). He is still suffering from the loss of his young German lover, Heinz, whom he failed to rescue from the Nazi authorities.

Also available in a full-length version as The Lost.

“Fascinating and brilliantly perceptive theatre.” – Jeff Jones, Stage Whispers

Read it Now

Performance rights must be secured before production

Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Robert Chuter
Email: robertjchuter@gmail.com

About the Playwright: Julia Britton (1914-2012) graduated at Manchester University (Hons, Classics, Hons. English) and worked as a journalist and university teacher before she became a playwright. Her plays have had productions at The Stage Company (Adelaide, Australia), The Blue Room (Perth), La Mama (Carlton), Performing Arts Productions (Melbourne), and Theatreworks (Melbourne). Her play Miles Franklin and the Rainbow’s End was chosen for performance at the San Antonio Festival, Texas, produced by The Stage Company of South Australia, and later performed at the Festival Centre, Adelaide.

She wrote and adapted numerous plays for Performing Arts Productions, including Lady Chatterley’s Lover (seven seasons nationally in Australia), Women in Love (Rippon Lea), Loving Friends (two seasons at Rippon Lea), An Indian Summer (Rippon Lea), Little Lord Fauntleroy (Rippon Lea), The Secret Garden (seven seasons including Adelaide), Anne of Green Gables (two seasons in Perth and Melbourne), and The Lost (two seasons in Melbourne at the Old Treasury Building).

Other plays include Hello, Last Page of My Life, Magdalena Amati, Somehow the Times Passes, and Internet Baby (all seen in readings at La Mama), The Children, The Professor (reading at Rippon Lea), Erotica in Black and White (reading Adelaide, Theatre 62, short version performed in Adelaide at Lion Theatre), and Mrs. Bloem.

Her music theatre includes Faith, Folk and Fun (at the National Gallery of Victoria) and The Music of Milhaud (two seasons at the University of Adelaide and the National University Canberra). Robbie Burns: The Farmer Poet and The Young Lord Byron were produced at the Scottish Festival at the Opera House, Omaru in New Zealand. Awards and Nominations include the AWGIE Award (Monte Miller Award) for Exit and Entrances, directed John Edwards; Best Play Award, ABC Radio, Queensland; and a nomination for the Victorian Green Room Award for In Transit.

A Singular Man was first performed at the Melbourne Fringe Festival in Melbourne, Australia on September 25th, 1996.

Odd Job Man by Peter Harrison

Odd Job Man

Drama/ 6 Characters, 4 Men, 2 Women/ Full Length, Two Acts

Synopsis: No unseemly clumsiness has ever marred the smooth efficiency of public executioner Albert Pierrepoint’s technique. He prides himself on speed and calm. Twenty seconds, more or less, to end the life of a man or a woman, without a mark being left on their hanging, hooded bodies. One thing which has never semed to trouble Albert is the guilt or innocence of those whose lives he has taken.

And then one night, a young woman walks through the door of the strangely-named Help The Poor Struggler public house he runs in the Oldham area of Lancashire, and asks to speak to Albert. As it becomes clear that she has a personal interest in one of Albert’s many executions, both Albert, and his devoted wife, Anne, finally confront the personal pain and grief which have lain behind so many of those judicial deaths.

The play makes use of information and incidents involving capital punishment revealed by Pierrepoint himself in his memoirs, including the occasion he was required to hang a customer of his own pub and the day a condemned man burst through the glass window of the Visitors’ Room during a final visit from his wife and daughter.

“Stunning — with a real twist in the tail. Beautifully written and beautifully acted.” — Allan Beswick, BBC Radio Manchester.

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Performance rights must be secured before production
Contact information:
Amateur and professional rights:
Peter Harrison
5 Lansdowne Road
Altrincham, Cheshire
WA14 4 HJ
Fixed phone: 0161.941.2627
Cellphone: 07790.227742
E-mail: phjh@globalnet.co.uk

About the Playwright: Peter Harrison is a former newspaper crime reporter and BBC radio and television journalist. Since taking early retirement from the BBC, he has had plays, stories and talks broadcast on BBC radio.

A lifelong opponent of capital punishment, Peter has written several plays concentrating on the life of probably the world’s most famous hangman, Albert Pierrepoint. The first, Odd Job Man, was staged by Altrincham Garrick Playhouse in 2004 who then took the production to the Buxton Fringe drama festival where it won awards for Best New Writing and Best Drama Production. It was later staged by professional actors from the Oldham Coliseum Theatre in 2008.

A one-man version, Pierrepoint: The Hangman’s Tale, was staged at the Unity Theatre, Liverpool; The Lowry, Salford Quays, Manchester; and The Dukes, Lancaster. The Circus On Lime Street, dealing with the tragic miscarriage of justice which saw a Liverpool petty criminal, George Kelly, convicted and hanged by Pierrepoint for the so-called Cameo Cinema Murders, was presented by 100th Meridian Theatre Co., Liverpool, in 2012 and repeated in 2013.

As well, his play Drums Along The Mersey, an account of the notorious incident in which The Beatles disposed of their drummer, Pete Best, was staged in 2016 at the Unity Theatre, Liverpool, Pete Best’s home town, before an audience including members of the Best family.

Peter’s radio plays include The City that Went To Sea (BBC Radio Manchester), marking the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Manchester Ship Canal; I’ll Be Seeing You (BBC Radio Manchester), commemorating the 50th anniversary of the end of WW2; A Box Of Old Shoes (BBC Radio Merseyside), marking the 50th anniversary of the end of WW2; and Dieppe, One-Way (BBC Radio Merseyside), commemorating the end of The Battle of The Atlantic.

Odd Job Man was first performed by the Altrincham Garrick Theatre, Altrincham, U.K. in 2004.